Elk

News

  • mule deer in Stanley Basin September 2008

    Hunters needed to help monitor for Chronic Wasting Disease in the Clearwater Region

    Biologists are asking hunters to help with a surveillance program looking for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). This is part of a general surveillance, rotational sampling strategy that IDFG initiated in 2017 to monitor for CWD.

  • 16-10-29_mores_creek_check_station_12-r3

    Hunters and anglers are reminded they must stop at check stations

    Hunting seasons are here, and soon hunters will see Fish and Game check stations throughout the state. Remember that all hunters must stop at Fish and Game check stations, regardless of whether they’ve harvested game. Failure to stop can result in a citation. 

  • cwd_training_in_lymph_node_removal

    What hunters can do to prevent introducing chronic wasting disease into Idaho

    Chronic Wasting Disease could someday change how some of Idaho’s deer, elk and moose populations are managed. Luckily, the disease has not been found in Idaho wildlife – yet, and hunters can help prevent human introduction of the disease by properly handling deer, elk, and moose harvested in other states and Canadian provinces. Many surrounding states have confirmed cases of Chronic Wasting Disease, or CWD, which is a fatal neurological disease that can directly impact the health of their deer, elk and moose populations.

  • idfg_coffee

    September Sportsmen's Breakfast

    Fish and Game will host a Sportsmen's Breakfast on September 17 at the Fish and Game Panhandle Regional Office in the Hunters Education wing. The office is located at 2885 W Kathleen Avenue in Coeur d'Alene.

    Breakfast starts at 6:30 am, with the program beginning at 7 am. This month, we will be giving an informational presentation regarding Chronic Wasting Disease and will be discussing the surveillance efforts that will be occurring in North Idaho this year. CWD has not been detected in Idaho.

    Join us and learn more!

  • img_2470_cropped_thumbnail

    Sweet, Idaho bull elk returns to captivity

    A young bull elk, given a second chance at freedom when returned to the wild country of Bear Valley, Idaho in mid-August, is back in captivity. On Sunday, September 1, Fish and Game officers found the young bull about three miles from its original release site where they contained and transported the bull to a Fish and Game holding area.

    A renewed search is now underway to find an accredited facility that will take the young bull. A nationwide search conducted just after the bull's capture in mid-August found no takers.

  • Fall Creek Burn

    Prescribed burn in unit 66 may continue into the first week of September

    Hunters in the Tex Creek Zone should be aware of prescribed burn activity in Unit 66. Some minor trail and area closures may be in effect into the first week of September as the Forest Service wraps up fire activity. Archery seasons for both deer and elk will be open during this time so hunters need to be aware and respect the closures for their safety. All closures will be temporary and mostly occur between Commissary Ridge and Fourth of July Ridge. All major roads in the area are expected to remain open.

     

  • Thank A Landowner

    Crossing private land to access public land for big game hunting is a privilege, not a right

    Often, big game hunts in Idaho require hunters to cross private land to reach their hunt unit that is usually on publicly-owned land. Many private landowners allow the public to cross their land, because they are often hunters themselves and support providing access to others so they can hunt on public lands and pursue the wildlife that lives there.

    Responsible hunting ethics on private land

    To ensure that private landowners and their land are respected, ultimately resulting in private lands remaining open to hunting access, hunters are reminded to:

  • Draw Results Available Now...

    Second controlled hunt draw results now online

    Results of the second controlled hunt drawing have been posted.
    Lookup results  Unclaimed tags

  • elk_in_ag_field

    Early season elk hunts require special precautions

    With antlerless elk hunts taking place in the Salmon Region, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game reminds hunters that they can increase their success and avoid possible conflict by always obtaining landowner permission, knowing the area they intend to hunt and taking extra precautions to properly care for their harvest.

    “Always get permission, scout the area beforehand, and plan for the heat,” says Dennis Newman, wildlife biologist for Idaho Fish and Game based in Salmon. “These are challenging hunts, but hunters who plan ahead and adjust to the conditions can do well.”

  • Alexandra Beus & family hunting in 2016

Elk

Cervus canadensis

Big Game
View Species Profile

Health Issues Which May Affect This Animal

What Causes This Disease?

The bacteria that are commonly associated with abscesses are common in the environment. A variety of bacteria are associated with abscesses in deer and elk including Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Trueperella pyogenes, Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp.. Most abscesses are found in lymph nodes and internal organs and contain thick, greenish yellow or white purulent material.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Abscesses occur commonly in many species of wildlife across North America. Abscesses of many origins in many wildlife species have been documented in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

Abscesses are typically characterized by variable sized pockets of pus which can be located anywhere on the body, usually under the skin or in skeletal muscles. In mammals, abscesses do not typically cause illness because the abscess is usually localized. Abscesses that spread along the muscle layers, or into various organs may cause pathological conditions that can be detrimental to the animal's health. In birds, abscesses usually form enlarged spherical areas that may hinder movement or feeding ability. In raptors, the feet are often involved (bumblefoot) and the enlarged areas can result in an inability to stand and to capture prey.

Read More About Abscesses

What Causes This Disease?

Brucellosis in elk, bison, and cattle is caused by Brucella abortus. There are a variety of other Brucella species can affect sheep (B. ovis), goats (B. melitensis), pigs, caribou and reindeer (B. suis), dogs (B. canis), and several species of marine mammals.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Brucellosis is found worldwide in livestock, but most countries have control or eradication programs to control or eliminate the disease. Brucellosis has largely been eliminated from domestic livestock in North America. A reservoir of brucellosis occurs in elk and bison in the Greater Yellowstone Area which includes eastern Idaho. Because wild ungulates and cattle share range, disease transmission to domestic cattle is of great concern.

Signs of Disease

There are no obvious signs of brucellosis in infected animals. Abortions can occur in the middle trimester of pregnancy. Elk infected with brucellosis may abort between January and June. There are no typical outward signs of Brucellosis in most animals. Males that are infected with brucellosis may have swollen testicles or swollen joints. In chronic infections can lead to infertility in both males and females..

Read More About Brucellosis

What Causes This Disease?

Carotid Artery Worm is caused by a parasitic nematode (Elaeophora schneideri) found in white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Carotid artery worms are widely distributed in the western United States, several southeastern states, and areas of Canada. The parasite has been documented in many parts of Idaho in mule deer, moose and elk..

Signs of Disease

Carotid artery worms are native parasites of mule deer, but have been found in white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Most animals show no signs of sickness. However, some animals can exhibit signs including malformed antlers, blindness, muzzle or ear necrosis (destruction), and oral impactions which are caused by the worms restricting blood flow through arteries.

Read More About Carotid Artery Worm

What Causes This Disease?

CWD is a neurologic disorder that causes the brain to degenerate and develop cavities becoming sponge like in appearance. It is caused by abnormally folded proteins called prions. CWD is contagious between animals by either direct or indirect contact with infected animals or their habitat. CWD is not believed to be contagious to people.

Where Is The Disease Found?

CWD has been documented in numerous states in the US, several Canadian provinces (Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta), South Korea, Norway and Finland in a variety of cervid species. It has been found in both captive and wild cervids. The current distribution of CWD in North America can be found in various links provided here. To date, there is no evidence that CWD is present in free-ranging deer or elk in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

Animals infected with CWD are typically thin and show neurologic signs. The most common sign of CWD is lack of feeding, increased drinking and excessive salvation and urination. Behavioral signs include loss of fear of humans and loss of awareness of their surroundings.The most common signs of CWD in live cervids are emaciation and neurological signs. There are no typical lesions seen in animals that die of CWD but consistent signs include poor body condition and aspiration pneumonia.

Read More About Chronic Wasting Disease

What Causes This Disease?

Giant liver flukes (Fascioloides magna), also known as the American liver fluke or deer fluke, are flatworms are important parasites of deer, elk and moose in North America. The flukes are a normal parasite in white-tailed deer and occasionally elk.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Giant liver flukes are found in mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, and moose in many parts of North America. Giant liver flukes have been documented sporadically in a few mule deer, elk and moose in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

Animals infected with giant liver flukes generally appear healthy unless large numbers of flukes are present. With large numbers of flukes, generally the liver function is compromised leading to animals in poor body condition. In definitive hosts, flukes are found in yellowish-white fibrous cysts that 1-2 inches across that contain pairs of flukes. A reddish brown liquid is found inside the cysts with the flukes. In animals that are not definitive hosts for giant liver flukes, the flukes can cause significant liver damage and ill thrift or death in severely affected individuals. The flukes continue to migrate in the liver creating numerous tracts and extensive liver damage that can lead to fibrosis and liver failure.

Read More About Giant Liver Flukes

What Causes This Disease?

Hydatids are the immature form of a tapeworm called Echinococcus granulosus. Echinococcus granulosus is a very small (3-5 m) tapeworm that requires two different animal species, a canid and an ungulate, to complete its lifecycle.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Hydatid disease is found around the world including North America where it exists in two forms – a domestic form involving domestic dogs and domestic sheep and a sylvatic form involving wolves or coyotes and ungulates. The most common form of E. granulosus is found in domestic dogs and sheep, and is found worldwide, including the western USA. The form in domestic dogs and domestic sheep is the most common source of the disease in humans. There are numerous strains of E .granulosus worldwide that occur in various host species systems e. g. wolves and wild ungulates in temperate North America, dingos and kangaroos in Australia, and jackels and domestic cattle in Africa. Hydatid cysts have been found in cattle and domestic sheep, deer, elk,. moose and mountain goats in Idaho. Adult tapeworms have been found in wolves and coyotes in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

The adult tapeworm occurs in the intestines of wolves, coyotes and foxes but they are generally asymptomatic. The larval form or hydatid cyst occurs in moose, elk and deer, and can occur in humans. In moose, deer, and elk, the cysts have thick walls and are filled with a clear watery liquid. The cysts are usually found in the lungs but can also occur in the liver or other organs. Cysts can vary in size from ¾ to 4 inches in diameter and contain hundreds of juvenile tapeworms. The presence of hydatids in herbivores usually does not cause clinical signs unless the cyst obstructs normal body function. If cysts rupture, illness can be severe.

Read More About Hydatid Disease

What Causes This Disease?

Meningeal worm is a nematode parasite, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Meningeal worm is found throughout eastern North America but is usually restricted to east of the 100th meridian. Meningeal worm has not been documented in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

In the normal host, white-tailed deer, and occasionally elk, the parasite causes no clinical disease. In most elk and other ruminants (domestic sheep and goats, mule deer, moose, elk, bighorn sheep, mountain goats), the abnormal migration of the L3 causes paresis of the limbs that can lead to paralysis and death.

Read More About Meningeal worm

What Causes This Disease?

The most common pathogens in bighorn sheep are respiratory bacteria Pasteurella haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, and Mycoplasma ovipneumonia but respiratory viruses like Infectious Bovine Rhinovirus, Parainfluenza virus, Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or parasites like lungworms can contribute to pneumonia in bighorns. There is evidence in captive and free-ranging bighorn sheep that transmission can occur after contact with domestic sheep or goats. Other species of ruminants can develop pneumonia from Pasteurellacae and other bacteria including Arcanobacter spp., Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, and Trueprella pyogenes as well as a variety of respiratory viruses. Lungworms can also be associated with pneumonia.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Generally, pneumonia is a problem in bighorn sheep and to a lesser extent in deer and elk. Pneumonia in bighorn sheep has been found throughout North America. In Idaho, pneumonia in bighorns has been found in all areas where bighorn sheep exist. Isolated cases of pneumonia have been documented in mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, moose, pronghorn and mountain goats in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

Clinical signs of pneumonia in ruminants include coughing, shortness of breath, and a weakened condition. Generally, animals with pneumonia will have discolored lungs possibly with adhesions to the rib cage or abscesses. In trials of captive bighorn sheep that are inoculated with Pasteurellaceae bacteria, survival is generally less than 2-3 days. Depending on the bacterial pathogen present, the nutritional and immune status of the individual, and other factors, affects range from chronic pneumonia in adult females, summer lamb mortality events and ill thrift to rapid whole herd mortality events . Often the mortality events are found by hunters or during herd surveys when carcasses or skeletons are found. Similar signs of disease occur in other ruminants affected by pneumonia but pneumonia in other species of ruminants tends to occur in single individuals rather than on a herd basis.

Read More About Pneumonia

What Causes This Disease?

Several species of tapeworm produce cystercerci in the intermediate host. The most common in cervids is Taenia hydatigena, but other species including T. pissiformis and T. krabbei.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Tapeworm cystercerci are found in appropriate ruminant hosts across most of North America. They are commonly reported in ungulates in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

Cystercerci are usually small bladders, approximately 0.5-2 cm in diameter, containing fluid and a single larval tapeworm. The location of the cystercerci depends on the tapeworm species and the host species. Taenia hydatigena and T. pissiformis typically form cystercerci in the mesenteries or the liver. Taenia krabbei typically forms cystercerci in the skeletal muscle. There also may be white, star-like scars on the surface of the liver from the migration of larval tapeworms. Carnivores like wolves, coyotes and foxes are the definitive host of the adult tapeworms and usually appear healthy even though they may be infected with large numbers of tapeworms.

Read More About Tapeworm cysts (Cystercerci)

What Causes This Disease?

Treponema Associated Hoof Disease (TAHD) in elk is associated with a spirochete bacterium, Treponema spp.

Where Is The Disease Found?

TAHD in elk is a relatively new condition in elk. Elk with hoof problems were first recognized in southwestern Washington in about 2000 with a dramatic increase in the number of affected animals reported in 2008. Since 2008, extensive surveillance by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has confirmed TAHD in elk in 14 counties in western Washington with scattered but unconfirmed cases in eastern Washington. TAHD was found in elk in Oregon in 2014 in an initial cluster in northwest Oregon. Since then, confirmed cases have been found in several areas of western Oregon with scattered unconfirmed cases in eastern Oregon. In December 2018, an adult female elk killed by a hunter near White Bird, Idaho in GMU 14 was found to have obvious foot abnormalities. The lower leg was submitted for diagnostic testing and TAHD was confirmed in this animal.

Signs of Disease

Animals affected by TAHD may be deficient in trace minerals like copper and/or selenium. The disease affects males and females of all age cohorts. Affected elk of all ages are lame with various degrees of deformed to elongated hooves, or with broken or missing hooves.

Read More About Treponema Associated Hoof Disease in Elk

What Causes This Disease?

Winter ticks are a one-host tick of ungulates. Large numbers of ticks can cause anemia due to blood loss, hair loss due to excessive grooming, and poor body condition due to inadequate food intake.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Winter ticks are present in nearly all areas of ungulate distribution in North America except for Alaska. Winter ticks have been identified in most ungulate species in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

Winter ticks are usually not seen on animals in the larval or nymphal stages as these are relatively small. The adult males and females are the same size as typical wood ticks. The engorged adult females can be 1-2 cm in diameter. Moose, elk and deer with large numbers of winter ticks often lose significant amounts of hair, especially in late winter. Some of these animals may be lethargic and appear weak from loss of blood, hypothermia and inadequate nutrition.

Read More About Winter ticks