Mountain Lion, Cougar, or Puma

Health Issues Which May Affect This Animal

What Causes This Disease?

Trichinosis is a disease caused by a nematode parasite, Trichinella spiralis.

Where Is The Disease Found?

Trichinosis occurs throughout North American and can be found in grizzly bears, polar bears, black bears, feral swine, mountain lions, wolverines, wolves, coyotes, and foxes. Trichinosis has been documented in black bears and mountain lions in Idaho. Trichinosis has been documented in humans associated with consuming home-made jerky made from a cougar and a black bear in Idaho.

Signs of Disease

Animals infected with trichinosis generally appear healthy. Trichinosis is hard to detect when butchering because there are few lesions and the cysts are very small. The cysts are most common in the muscles of the jaw, tongue, and diaphragm. Animals that are infected with adult worms may have swollen intestines with small bruises on the intestinal wall. Affected muscles and associated lymph nodes may be soft and swollen.

Read More About Trichinosis

News

  • Mt lion caching elk carcass

    Wildlife CSI - Panhandle elk mortality study

    The Panhandle region placed 172 GPS radio-collars on 6-month old elk calves in the Coeur d’Alene and St. Joe River drainages since 2015.  A couple reasons we collared so many elk was to determine survival rates and for those elk that didn’t make it, find out why they died.

  • Living with Mountain Lions brochure

    Cougar in Boise is a reminder we all live near wildlife

    Most wildlife encounters, including those with mountain lions, are brief and non threatening, but  Fish and Game provides tips for people to help them understand more about these cats, what do if they see one, and how they can avoid attracting mountain lions to their homes and property. 

  • Mountain Lion in tree

    Mountain Lion Sightings Serve as Reminder to Use Caution

    It's no secret that Idaho is known for its abundant and diversity of wildlife.

    Yet to the surprise of some people, wildlife - including mountain lions - can be found in and around where people live.

    Recent mountain lion sightings near Juliaetta should serve as a reminder to residents and visitors that they can expect to see lions anywhere in Idaho.

    In the past few weeks, lions have been spotted outside of the community of Juliaetta.

  • F&G finds safe new home for orphaned mountain lion kittens

    Two orphaned mountain lion kittens took refuge behind hay bales in a barn in Meadows near McCall, much to the surprise of the property owners and their horses. Too small to make it on their own, and after several weeks of becoming habituated to and fed by humans, Fish and Game decided that a captive facility would be the best option for these naïve youngsters.

  • Lion in Cottonwood tree

    Female mountain lion harvest season closed in Unit 23

    Lion hunters should note that the harvest season for female mountain lion has closed in game management unit 23, as the harvest quota of eight females was reached March 9, 2017.

    Hunters will be allowed to keep female mountain lions taken prior to this closure but must report them within five days of harvest. The harvest season in this unit remains open for males only until the season ends March 31, 2017.

  • Mountain Lion in tree

    Female mountain lion harvest season closed in Unit 39 near Idaho City

    Mountain lion hunters should note that the harvest season for female mountain lion has closed in game management unit 39, as the harvest quota of ten females was reached February 23, 2017.

    Hunters will be allowed to keep female mountain lions taken prior to this closure but must report them within five days of harvest. The harvest season in this unit remains open for males only until the season ends March 31, 2017.

  • Lion in Cottonwood tree

    Mountain lion harvest season closed in Unit 55

    Mountain lion hunters should note that the harvest season for both female and male mountain lion has closed in game management Unit 55 south of Burley, as the harvest quota of six females was reached February 14, 2017.   

    Hunters will be allowed to keep mountain lions taken prior to this closure but must report them within five days of harvest. The dog training season remains open in this unit until March 31, 2017.

  • Bull elk

    Idaho’s 2017 & 2018 big game season proposals available online

    Idaho Fish and Game's proposed changes for the 2017 & 2018 big game hunting seasons are available online for public review and comment.

    The proposals for deer, elk, pronghorn, black bear, mountain lion and gray wolf are listed by region and are available at: https://idfg.idaho.gov/form/big-game-2017. Only those seasons and hunts for which changes are proposed are listed.  All others will remain the same as they were during the 2015 & 2016 hunting seasons.

  • Lion in Cottonwood tree

    Female mountain lion harvest season closed in Unit 36B near Challis

    Mountain lion hunters should note that the harvest season for female mountain lion has closed in game management unit 36B near Challis, as the harvest quota of two females was reached February 9, 2017.   

    Hunters will be allowed to keep female mountain lions taken prior to this closure but must report them within five days of harvest. The harvest season in this unit remains open for males only until the season ends March 31, 2017. 

  • mountain lion kitten

    Fish and Game Releases Fourth Mountain Lion Kitten

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has finally released the fourth mountain lion kitten that was captured from the Johnny Creek Area at the end of January.

    Using signals from a radio collar affixed to the mother mountain lion, Fish and Game was able to determine her location by the end of last week and released the kitten in proximity to her.

Mountain Lion, Cougar, or Puma

Puma concolor

IDAPA Classification: Big Game
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