Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact

In 1989 Colorado, Nevada and Oregon entered into a newly formed Wildlife Violator Compact. In 1991, Idaho and Arizona joined the compact. Today, 44 states spanning the country have become members of the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact (IWVC).

The status of the 6 remaining states is as follows:

  • North Carolina passed legislation in 2008 to join the compact but they have not officially joined the compact to date. They should get their application submitted and administrative processes in place to join as a member state by the end of Summer 2017.
     
  • Delaware passed legislation in 2013 to join the compact but they have not officially joined the compact to date. They have not instituted all of the administrative and licensing processes in place to officially join the compact yet.
     
  • New Jersey passed legislation in January 2017 to join the compact and to date have not made formal application. They are working on getting all of their administrative processes in place.
     
  • Nebraska passed legislation and signed by their Governor on May 2, 2017 to join the compact. They are working on getting all of their administrative processes in place.
     
  • Massachusetts made a run at joining the compact last year and it did not go forward. The compact legislation is moving forward again this 2017 legislative session.
     
  • Hawaii made a run at joining the compact in 2016 and it did not go forward.
The IWVC assures non-resident violators receiving citations for certain wildlife violations in participating states the same treatment accorded residents who are in violation. Procedures are established which cause a non-resident violator who fails to comply with the terms of a citation issued in a participating state to face the possibility of the suspension of his wildlife license privileges in his home state until the terms of the citation are met. Safeguards are built into the WVC to assure that a non-resident violator is afforded all due process protection.

The WVC provides for the reciprocal recognition of the suspension of license privileges by participating states. The reciprocal recognition of suspensions is intended to address the problems associated with the mobility of many violators.

Finally, the WVC provides that information on convictions in participating states shall be forwarded to the home state of the violator. The home state shall treat such convictions as if they had occurred in that state for the purposes of license suspension actions. The WVC not only assures equal treatment of residents and non-residents of participating states, but also enhances the law enforcement services and deterrent value of time spent patrolling by uniformed officers.
 
Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact
Member States and Effective Dates
State Effective Date
Alabama 3/1/2010
Alaska 9/8/2008
Arizona 10/14/1991
California 1/01/2002
Colorado 2/25/1991
Florida 9/01/2006
Georgia 6/01/2003
Idaho 3/15/1991
Illinois 7/01/2007
Indiana 10/31/2001
Iowa 8/31/2001
Kansas 11/1/2005
Kentucky 7/15/2008
Louisiana 2/01/2009
Maryland 2/28/2000
Michigan 8/8/2005
Minnesota 3/01/2000
Mississippi 9/01/2007
Missouri 12/20/1999
Montana 2/3/1996
 
Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact
Member States and Effective Dates
State Effective Date
Nevada 2/19/1991
New Mexico 8/30/2001
New York 3/01/2006
North Dakota 8/15/2001
Ohio 1/01/2008
Oklahoma 9/20/2010
Oregon 2/19/1991
Pennsylvania 1/1/2011
South Carolina 7/1/2012
South Dakota 9/01/2004
Tennessee 11/01/2006
Texas 5/30/2010
Utah 3/01/1993
Virginia 12/1/2011
Vermont 1/1/2013
Washington 3/15/1991
West Virginia 11/23/2009
Wisconsin 4/15/2008
Wyoming 8/3/1996
 
Last Updated: February 5, 2015 
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