Status and distribution of colonial nesting waterbirds in southern Idaho, 1993

Publication Type:

Report

Source:

Bureau of Land Management, Idaho State Office, Boise, p.7 + app (1994)

Call Number:

U94TRO01IDUS

URL:

http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/id/publications/technical_bulletins.Par.16448.File.dat/TB_94-6.pdf

Keywords:

Aechmophorus clarkia, Aechmophorus occidentalis, American White Pelican, Ardea alba, Ardea herodias, black tern, black-crowned night-heron, Bubulcus ibis, California gull, Caspian tern, cattle egret, Chlidonias niger, Clark's grebe, common tern, double-crested cormorant, eared grebe, Egretta thula, Forster's tern, Franklin's gull, Great Blue Heron, great egret, Larus californicus, Larus delawarensis, Larus pipixcan, Nycticorax nycticorax, Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, Phalacrocorax auritus, Plegadis chihi, Podiceps nigricollis, ring-billed gull, snowy egret, Sterna caspia, Sterna forsteri, Sterna hirundo, SWAP, Western Grebe, white-faced Ibis

Abstract:

The authors reviewed the status of 18 species (eared, western, and Clark's grebes; American white pelican; double-crested cormorant; great blue heron; black-crowned night-heron; snowy, cattle, and great egrets; white-faced ibis; California, ring-billed, and Franklin's gulls; and Caspian, common, Forster's, and black terns) of colonially nesting waterbirds in southern Idaho and present the results of a survey they conducted in spring and summer 1993. They found that the heron, egret, and ibis populations are stable or increasing. Expected breeding presence at Duck Valley Indian Reservation was confirmed. American white pelicans continue to increase in breeding numbers, with two successful colonies established in eastern Idaho. All of the gull species in southern Idaho seem to be stable or increasing. There is some concern over possible effects of poor water quality and water level fluctuations on nesting efforts of western and Clark's grebes, at least on the Snake River Plain. Caspian and black terns appear to be holding steady, but there is grave concern over both Forster's and common terns in Idaho. Their reproductive attempts this year were apparently failures, possibly due to winter fish kills in their breeding areas. The authors feel that an effort to monitor these two species should continue at least through 1994. They provide five recommendations for conservation of these species: 1) increased protection of breeding birds; 2) consistent, yearly censusing of birds on waterfowl refuges and management areas; 3) a program of collecting basic natural history information for these birds; 4) consideration of the needs of colonially nesting waterbirds when making water management decisions; and 5) regular population monitoring on a statewide basis.

Notes:

ELECTRONIC FILE - Zoology: Birds

SWAP (2/19/2016) citation:
Trost CH, Gerstell A. 1994. Status and distribution of colonial nesting waterbirds in southern Idaho, 1993. Boise (ID): US Bureau of Land Management, Idaho State Office. 7 p. Tech. Bull. No.: 94-6. [accessed 2015 Jun 01]. http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/id/publications/technical_bulletin....

Generic citation: Trost, C. H., and A. Gerstell. 1994. Status and distribution of colonial nesting waterbirds in southern Idaho, 1993. Technical Bulletin No. 94-6. Bureau of Land Management, Idaho State Office, Boise, ID. 7 p. + appendices. Available at: http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/id/publications/technical_bulletin....
OR
Trost, C. H., and A. Gerstell. 1994. Status and distribution of colonial nesting waterbirds in southern Idaho, 1993. Report submitted to the Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program, Idaho Department of Fish and Game. [105 p].

Additional info: Authors' affiliation: (Department of Biological Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID)