Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 51 - 75 of 136 questions

A: 

Yes. Information about the current program we have for nonresident disabled veterans can be found on our website under the license tab. Look for the Disabled Veterans Programs link.
Nonresident Disabled VeteransNonresident disabled veterans participating in a hunt in association with a qualified organization may be eligible for reduced fees for licenses and tags. To qualify, nonresident disabled veterans must meet the definitions and provide the three documentation items listed below to an Idaho Department of Fish and Game office in person or by mail to: License Supervisor, P.O. Box 25, Boise, Idaho 83707. 
A letter from the Veterans Affairs office verifying a service-connected disability rating of 40 percent or greater. Such documentation can bear any date prior to license application.
A current letter from a qualified organization documenting that the license applicant is participating in a hunt in association with the organization. For the purposes of this program participation includes but is not limited to: arranging access for the hunt through a landowner or outfitter, connecting the participant with an outfitter, organizing a group of individuals to participate in the hunt, providing funds, equipment or other direct support for the hunt.
Documentation of the participating organization's mission to offer opportunities, experiences, and assistance to disabled veterans (typically provided by including a copy of the organization's mission statement) and their nonprofit status under 501(c)(3) or 501 (c)(19) of the Internal Revenue Code or the qualified organization is a government agency with a mission to offer opportunities, experiences, and assistance to disabled veterans.
This documentation must be provided annually.
Nonresident disabled veterans who meet these conditions may be eligible for reduced fees: hunting license $5; deer tag $10.75; elk tag $16.50; bear tag $6.75; and turkey tag $10.75.
For additional information you may contact our license section at 208-334-2592.

answered 1/31/2014

A: 

Idaho Code 36-202(t) explicitly defines a senior resident an any person over 65 years of age who has lived in the state for 5 years so if your 65th birthday is not until February, you cannot purchase a Sr. license at age 64 and 11 months in January.  However, one option is to purchase your adult license if you really need it in January rather than waiting until February and then, when you meet the Sr. age requirement, you could essentially trade in your adult license for a senior license at one of our Fish and Game offices. Although we will not refund the difference in license cost, at the point of getting the Sr. license, you would become eligible for discounted Sr. tags for deer, elk, bear, and turkey if that was important to you for the upcoming fall hunting season. 

answered 1/3/2014

Q: licensing

Being an out of state hunter I was wondering why you don't offer a rebate on the license which is required prior to purchasing or entering the draw process, because if you are not drawn for a hunt area, you essentially cannot hunt.

A: 

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) requires a hunting license to be purchased by both residents and nonresidents prior to applying for a controlled hunt. Neither group receives a refund of the license fees once the license has been used to apply for a controlled hunt.
IDFG does offer over the counter hunts in a majority of the state. Individuals who are not drawn in the controlled hunt process may purchase general season deer and/or elk tags. IDFG also has many other hunting opportunities such as turkey, black bear and mountain lion. If you would like additional information about our general season hunts, you may visit our hunting page at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/i/huntidaho/ or contact our license section at 208-334-2592.
 

answered 12/11/2013

A: 

You only need an archery permit to hunt during an archery-only season. There are no "archery-only" turkey hunts, just general and controlled hunts.  
To hunt turkeys with a bow during a general season, you need 2 items:  a turkey tag and a valid nonresident license (3 license options: 1.  Hunting, 2.  Small Game Hunting, or 3.  Three-Day Nonresident Small Game Hunting).    
Good luck.  

answered 11/28/2013

A: 

A person may apply for only one species.  Any person applying for a moose, bighorn sheep, or mountain goat hunt is prohibited from applying for any other big game controlled hunt in the same year.  Except: they may apply for a controlled depredation hunt for deer, elk, or pronghorn, a controlled black bear hunt, or leftover deer, elk, or pronghorn controlled hunt tag, an unlimited controlled hunt, or extra deer, elk, pronghorn, or turkey hunt.

answered 10/31/2013

A: 

No, every hunter who hunts for big game or turkey must have their own tag.

answered 10/12/2013

Q: Doctors letter for refund-non resident?

Because of a medical condition, I won't be able to hunt Elk in Idaho next month. I have read the Refund policy, and wonder can the Doctors letter be a fax on his letterhead or do I have to get an original from him to send to you?

A: 

Here is the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Commission Refund Rule:
IDAPA 13.01.04.600
03. Refunds. The fee for any nonresident license (as defined in Section 36-202(z), Idaho Code) shall not be refunded for any reason except as follows.
a. Hunting license and general season deer and elk tag refunds due to death, illness/injury or military deployment of licensee. Non-resident general season deer or elk tag fees and prerequisite hunting license fee and controlled hunt deer and elk tag fees may be refunded for death of licensee; illness or injury of licensee which totally disabled the licensee for the entire length of any applicable hunting season; or military deployment of licensee due to an armed conflict. Refund must be substantiated by death certificate, published obituary, written justification by a licensed medical doctor, copy of military orders, or other similar substantiating documents. The hunting license fee will not be refunded if it was used to apply for any controlled hunt or to purchase a turkey, mountain lion, or bear tag. The amount refunded will be the amount of the applicable deer or elk tag and hunting license less all issuance fees and a fifty dollar ($50) processing fee. The refund request must be postmarked on or before December 31 of the calendar year in which the license and tags were valid.
b. General season and controlled hunt deer and elk tag refunds for other than death, illness/injury, or military deployment of licensee. Non-resident general season and controlled hunt deer or elk tag fees may be refunded for any reason other than death of the licensee; illness or injury of licensee that totally disables the licensee for the entire length of all applicable seasons; or military deployment of licensee due to an armed conflict. The request for the refund must be postmarked in the year in which the tag is valid. The hunting license fee will not be refunded. The refund will be based on the following sliding scale as a percent of the deer or elk tag fee.
 

Postmarked

Percent of Fee Refunded

Before April 1

75%

In April through June

50%

In July and August

25%

September through December

0%

c. Department Error. The Department determines that a Department employee made an error in the issuance of the license.
d. Submission Requirements. All refund requests must be in writing and be accompanied with the original copy of the license or tag.  
e. Effective. These changes will be effective with the 1997 licenses and tags.
The URL for the Commission rules can be found at http://adminrules.idaho.gov/rules/current/13/0104.pdf

answered 9/24/2013

Q: Tags with a hunting passport

Does the hunting passport program allow a first-time hunter to purchase a tag? Example: my daughter has not completed hunter safety yet. Can I buy her a tag and can she fill it?

A: 

Sorry for the delay in responding.
Yes.  If your daughter is 12 years of age or older and has not completed hunter education, she can purchase a Hunting Passport and a deer tag. More information on the program can be found  http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/?getPage=332.
Must be 12 years of age to hunt big game; 10 years of age to hunt turkey and sandhill crane; 8 years of age to hunt other game birds, upland game animals, furbearers, predatory or unprotected species. 
Holders of a Hunting Passport must purchase general season tags and all permits and validations to participate in the hunt.  
All hunting rules, seasons and weapon restrictions apply to the holder of a Hunting Passport. 

answered 9/23/2013

A: 

Yes, you can use your general spring turkey tag for a fall turkey so long as the tag is unused (see page 20 in upland game rules book).

answered 9/6/2013

Q: What are the legalities of hunting with air rifles?

Are there any restrictions on air rifles or the type of game that can be taken with them?

A: 

Predatory wildlife (raccoon, coyote, jackrabbit, weasel, skunk, and starling) and unprotected wildlife may be legally hunted with an Airgun at any time and in any amount. Cottontail rabbit and Snowshoe hares may be hunted with an Airgun during season (See Upland Game, Furbearer & Turkey Seasons and Rules Brochure for seasons, bag and possession limits). A valid Idaho Hunting or Combination license is required.

answered 6/16/2013

A: 

The application period for deer, elk, pronghorn, fall bear and turkey hunts was May 1-June 5. 

answered 6/13/2013

Q: Rumor has it that the wild turkeys caught pneumonia last fall or winter and killed 80%, Seems like a rumor to me??? T or F?

Been hunting turkeys in general areas since opening day and even yesterday. Been to Orofino, Tiwn Springs, Prarie and Banks. Hunted these areas in previous years and always had good success. Not this year though. I am not encountering any turkey sign in these areas with the excpetion of Orofino and even there, it is not abundant like ususal. The toms are not talking at all. I am wondering if they bred early when we had the warmer weather in late March and not talking now, or there really was a loss due to pneumonia or other disease. Are certain areas affected more than other??? Really seems different and unusal this year than in the past several.
My hunting friends say the birds are talking a little in Council and Grangeville, other than that, they are not hearing or locating any birds or sign anywhere.
Would please provide any information that you have regading wild turkeys.
Thank you very much.

A: 

Like many upland game birds, there can be dramatic annual variation in the population size.  The Department is unaware of any disease issues with wild turkeys.  There has been a documented decline in turkeys in the southwest part of the state, but we believe that has been a result of harsh winter conditions in recent years.  Most reports from the Clearwater Region have been positive and turkeys have traditionally done very well in this area.

answered 5/6/2013

A: 

Idaho’s Hunting Passport is a component of Fish and Game’s mentored hunting program. The Hunting Passport allows any first-time hunter, resident or nonresident, age 8 and older to try hunting for one year with an adult mentor without first having to complete an Idaho hunter education course.
 
Hunting Passport Highlights:
Hunting Passports are only available to first time hunters. Those that have previously held a hunting license in any state are not eligible.
Hunter Education certification is not needed to obtain a Hunting Passport. If an individual has completed a Hunter Education course but has not yet purchased a license, they are eligible for a Hunting Passport.
The minimum age to hold a Hunting Passport is eight years of age; there is no maximum age.
The Hunting Passport is a calendar year item just like a hunting license and expires on December 31 of the year in which it was obtained.
Only one Passport can be purchased in a lifetime. To continue hunting after the Passport expires, completion of a hunter education course and license purchase is required.
Hunting Passports are available at license vendors and Fish and Game regional offices.
Cost is $1.75.
 
Mentored Hunter
 
Must be 12 years of age to hunt big game; 10 years of age to hunt turkey and sandhill crane; 8 years of age to hunt other game birds, upland game animals, furbearers, predatory or unprotected species.
Holders of a Hunting Passport must purchase general season tags and all permits and validations to participate in the hunt.
All hunting rules, seasons and weapon restrictions apply to the holder of a Hunting Passport.
Holders of a Hunting Passport are not eligible to possess a controlled hunt tag but may be designated a Landowner controlled hunt tag.
Must carry their Hunting Passport on their person while hunting and produce it if requested by a conservation officer.
Mentors
 
Must be age 18 or older.
Must possess a valid Idaho hunting license.
May not accompany more than 2 mentored hunters at one time. Accompany means close enough to be within normal conversation or hearing range without shouting or the aid of electronic devices.
Are not restricted from hunting with valid license and tags while serving as a mentor.
Are not restricted to the type of hunting the mentored hunter has tags for. For example, the holder of a hunting passport and general elk tag could be mentored by an adult possessing a nonresident small game license.
Any mentor accompanying the holder of a nonresident junior mentored tag must possess a tag for the same species, valid in the same area.
No registration is required for the mentor.
 
Frequently Asked Questions about the Hunter Passport are listed on our Website at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/?getPage=332.
 
 

answered 4/27/2013

A: 

TURKEY SEASON DATES 2013
General Spring Hunt season dates April 15, 2013 through May 25, 2013
Panhandle units 1, 2 (Except Farragut State Park and Farragut WMA) & Units 3, 4, 4A, 5, 6
And  the same dates in the rest of the state in units 8, 8A, 10, 10A, 11, 11A, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16A, 17, 18, 19, 19A, 20, 22, 23, 24, 31, 32 (except that portion in Payette County), 32A, 33, 39, 73, 74, 75, 77 and 78.
General Fall Turkey Hunt Season Dates
September 15, 2013 through December 15, 2013.
Panhandle units 1, 2 (except Farragut State Park and Farragut WMA) 3, 4, 4A, 5 and 6.
September 15, 2013 through October 9, 2013.
General Fall Hunt in Game Management Units 8, 8A, 10, 10A, 11, 11A, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16A, 17, 18, 19 , 20.
November 21, 2013 through December 31, 2013.
General Fall Hunt in Game Management Units 8, 8A, 10A, 11, 11A, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 18. This hunt is open on private lands only.

answered 4/25/2013

A: 

The archery permit is only required for big game hunting, not turkey hunting.

answered 4/25/2013

A: 

Nonresident prices:
You must either have an Idaho nonresident hunting license ($154.75) or an Idaho nonresident combination (hunting and fishing license) $240.00.
You must also purchase a bear tag ($186.00).  If you decide to add a turkey to your hunting the cost of the tag is $80.00.
We list all of our vendors on our website at https://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/lookupVendors.cfm.  Any vendor can sell you a tag and license.

answered 4/24/2013

Q: Can I put in for bighorn sheep and still put in for deer and elk?

So if I put in for bighorn can I put in for deer and elk

A: 

Any person applying for any moose, bighorn sheep, or mountain goat hunt is prohibited from applying for any other big game controlled hunt in the same year.
Except:
They may apply for a controlled depredation hunt for deer, elk, or pronghorn, a controlled black bear hunt, or leftover deer, elk or pronghorn controlled hunt tag, an unlimited controlled hunt, or extra deer, elk, pronghorn, or turkey hunt.

answered 4/21/2013

A: 

No.  You may be contacted at some point for information, but no report is required until then.

answered 4/20/2013

A: 

The daily bag limit is one bearded turkey per day in the spring
and one turkey (either sex) per day in the fall, except in Units,
1, 2, 3 and 5 where 5 turkeys (either sex) may be taken in a
day during fall seasons. No more than two bearded turkeys
may be taken per spring. The most tags one hunter may
possess in one year is six.

answered 4/6/2013

A: 

It depends...Any person applying for any moose, bighorn sheep, or mountain goat hunt is prohibited from applying for any other big game controlled hunt in the same year. 
Except:
They may apply for a controlled depredation hunt for deer, elk, or pronghorn, a controlled black bear hunt, or leftover deer, elk or pronghorn controlled hunt tag, an unlimited controlled hunt, or extra deer, elk, pronghorn, or turkey hunt.
 

answered 4/2/2013

A: 

Lawful Methods of Take Upland Game Birds
 
To take upland game birds in Idaho, all hunters may use a bow, muzzleloader shooting shot or shotgun with lead or steel shot with shells not exceeding 3 ½ inches in length. Shotguns are not required to be plugged when hunting upland game birds.
 
Hunters also may use dogs to locate, flush and retrieve upland game birds. (but not turkey, except during fall hunts)
Mechanical (i.e. expandable) broadheads are legal for hunting turkeys in Idaho.
 
 
Methods of Take — Restrictions—turkey
 
It is unlawful to hunt turkey:
 
• With lead shot exceeding BB size or steel shot exceeding T size.
 
• By use of dogs, except during fall hunts.

answered 3/24/2013

Q: can a person apply for moose, goat, or sheep controlled hunts and also apply for a deer or elk controlled hunt?

the way i understand the regulations is that Moose, Sheep, and Goat are special controlled hunts because they are once in a lifetime harvest and that you can applly for a Deer, Elk, Bear, Lion, or Turkey contolled hunt also in the same season.

A: 

 Any person applying for any moose, bighorn sheep, or mountain goat hunt is prohibited from applying for any other big game controlled hunt in the same year.
Except:
They may apply for a controlled depredation hunt for deer, elk, or pronghorn, a controlled black bear hunt, or leftover deer, elk or pronghorn controlled hunt tag, an unlimited controlled hunt, or extra deer, elk, pronghorn, or turkey hunt.
 

answered 3/17/2013

A: 

No.
No person shall take upland game birds [including turkeys]:
- From one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Upland game shall not be taken before 10 a.m. on Fort Boise, C.J. Strike, Montour and Payette River WMAs, during the pheasant season. Turkeys shall not be taken from sunset to one-half hour before sunrise.
- With a trap, snare, net, crossbow, slingshot, hand-held or thrown missiles, firearms except a shotgun using shells not exceeding 3 ½ inches maximum length, except forest grouse. Forest grouse shall not be taken with a trap, snare, net or crossbow.
- From any watercraft.
- By the use or aid of any electronic call.
- By the aid of baiting. Bait is defined as any substance placed to attract game.

answered 3/8/2013

Q: What Animals can legally be Hunted with an Airgun?

I'm wondering what animals and birds can legally be hunted with an airgun? Also, is there a minimum caliber required?
Thanks!

A: 

Predatory wildlife (raccoon, coyote, jackrabbit, weasel, skunk, and starling) and unprotected wildlife may be legally hunted with an Airgun at any time and in any amount. Cottontail rabbit and Snowshoe hares may be hunted with an Airgun during season (See Upland Game, Furbearer & Turkey Seasons and Rules Brochure for seasons, bag and possession limits). A valid Idaho Hunting or Combination license is required.

answered 2/24/2013