Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 126 - 150 of 198 questions

Q: When I bring home trout I tend to fillet them leaving some waste. Can I use the head or any other part as catfish bait?

I know in some states, using any part of a game fish as bait is illegal. I also know that trout must be killed when removed from the water where they were harvested. I just hate wasting the head and tails of trout carcasses if I could be using them to catch catfish. Thank you.

A: 

Using dead fish and fish parts as bait is legal:
Bait:
Organic substances, other than rubber, wood feather, fiber, or plastic, attached to a hook to attract fish. Bait includes insects, insect larvae, worms, dead fish, fish parts, any other animal or vegetable matter, or scented synthetic materials.
Note: Use of live fish , leeches, frogs, salamanders, waterdogs or shrimp as bait is prohibited in Idaho, except that live crayfish may be used if caught on the body of water being fished.

answered 6/11/2013

Q: Fishing with a 2 pole permit for trout, steelhead or salmon

I have a technical question on fishing for trout, steelhead and salmon with a two pole permit. I have always purchased a two pole permit and used 2 poles for trout and steelhead. I do have a specific question on daily limits and fishing with two poles. For example I was told that once I had harvested 4 trout out of 5 that I could only use 1 pole to catch my last fish of the day by another fisherman. I did not think that was correct but could not find anything in the regulations about it? Does it apply per species, is it different for salmon and steelhead? I was under the impression that when I purchase a two pole permit it allows me to use my 2 poles until my limit is reached? thank you for the clarification..

A: 

As long as you have the two-pole permit you can fish with two poles until your limit is reached.  You don't have to stop using two poles when you only have one more fish left to make your limit.  Two poles can be used for steelhead, Chinook and trout fishing.

answered 6/7/2013

A: 

Our guess would be a small parasite - possibly a copepod.  They cause ulcerations on fish that lead to what appear to be pustules and open sores.  There is no risk to human heath if the fish is cooked properly.  Many times, as the sores heal, there will be scar which look like grains of sand.

answered 6/3/2013

A: 

Yes, we do allow the use of game fish for cut bait when fishing for sturgeon.
F08

answered 6/3/2013

A: 

You can keep 6 rainbow trout from Lightening Creek but none of those can be cutthroat trout.  That is from Memorial Day weekend to December 1.  After December 1, there is a catch-and-release season.  There is no limit on lake trout in the Lightening Creek system.  You can also keep 6 kokanee.  Typically, they are found in the creek during the fall and early winter when they run into tributaries to spawn.
Fishing success varies by time of year.  In the summer, fish deeper pockets and back eddys.  I use bait or roostertails for the best success.  If you fly fish, match the hatch in the spring and summer.  Winter fishing is the biggest challenge.
 

answered 5/31/2013

Q: Why is it necessary to keep trout with the head and tail while transporting?

Many spots have nice fish cleaning stations for use. It is much easier for transport and storage to fillet the fish on the spot. After all, they are not like bass which have a minimum legal length.

A: 

The requirement that rainbow trout must have heads and tails attached while in transit is due to the fact that there are some fisheries with length restrictions on harvested fish.  Examples would be lake trout from Payette Lake (none over 30"); So. Fork Snake River brown trout harvest (2 over 16"); Henrys Lake tributaries (2 brook trout over 16"), Twenty-four Mile Reservoir (2 trout, none under 20"), etc..
The other reason for requiring heads and tails be attached is because in waters with anadromous fish (steelhead) a rainbow trout over 24" in length is classified as a "steelhead" whether it migrates to the ocean or not.  If you remove the head and/or tail, we can't verify the length.  We also need to have the tail attached so we can verify whether the rainbow/steelhead was produced in a hatchery. 

answered 5/27/2013

A: 

Yes, there are smallmouth bass in Long Tom Reservoir.

answered 5/12/2013

A: 

Steelhead are rainbow trout longer than 20 inches in length in the Snake River drainage below Hells Canyon Dam, the Salmon River drainage (excluding lakes and the Pahsimeroi and Lemhi rivers), and the Clearwater River drainage (excluding that portion above Dworshak Dam and lakes). Rainbow trout longer than 20 inches in length with the adipose fin clipped, as evidenced by a healed scar, are defined as steelhead in the Snake River from Hells Canyon Dam upstream to Oxbow Dam and in the Boise River from its mouth upstream to Barber Dam, during steelhead seasons.
Only steelhead with a clipped adipose fin (see Page 47), as evidenced by a healed scar, may be kept. These are hatchery fish that had their adipose fin removed as juveniles. All naturally produced steelhead with an intact adipose fin must be released because they are listed as “Threatened” under the Endangered Species Act (see Page 48). Some hatchery steelhead are not adipose fin clipped and must also be released.

answered 4/12/2013

Q: Can You use freshwater mussels as fish bait?

I was recently told that mussels were good bait for trout and steelhead. While discussing this with a fishing buddy, He said it was illegal to harvest mussels and therefore illegal to use them as bait. Can you please clarify this for me?

A: 

Yes, freshwater mussels can be used for fish bait. 
In Idaho, there are no limits or restrictions on harvesting mussels.  Once mussels are removed from their shells, they cannot survive, so they are not considered "live" bait.

answered 3/27/2013

A: 

There are no restrictions on wading below Henrys Lake.  While there are many redds visible, and many anglers wading through the stream (and even through redds), it is rare for impacts from wading to have enough of an impact on egg to fry survival to reduce fish populations.  In general terms, the number of fish living through their first year of life is dictated by other factors aside from egg survival success.  In many instances (and particularly in a harsh environment like Island Park) winter conditions dictate how many fish survive their first year of life.  As such, anglers wading through redds won't decrease the number of trout that eventually recruit to the population.
If you are fishing the Outlet, please remember that the upper 1/2 mile flows through private land on both sides of the river.  As such, it is important to stay in the water, and not get out on the river banks. 

answered 3/6/2013

A: 

 
It is legal to catch them but they must be released or killed:

 

Game Fish:

Brook, brown, bull, cutthroat, golden, lake (Mackinaw), rainbow (including steelhead), splake and Sunapee trout; trout hybrids; Chinook, coho, Atlantic, and kokanee (blueback) salmon; grayling; whitefish; cisco;
crappie; perch; bass; catfish; bullhead; sunfish; sturgeon; northern pike; tiger muskie; walleye and sauger; and burbot (Ling).
Bullfrogs and crayfish are also defined as game fish.
Holding Live Fish:
No permit is required to keep game fish alive that have legally been reduced to possession, in a live well, net or on a stringer while at the body of water from which they were taken. All fish must be killed or released
prior to leaving the water body. However, anadromous salmon and steelhead must either be killed or released after landing.
Movement and Introduction of Live Fish:
It is illegal to release or allow the release of any species of live fish (including crayfish and bullfrogs),
 

answered 3/5/2013

Q: can catfish be taken with a bow?

I can't find where it is listed as a game fish or not in the regulations.

A: 

Catfish are game fish so you can not use a bow to harvest them. 
IDAPA 13.01.11.004. Gamefish:  Brook, brown, bull, cutthroat, golden, lake, rainbow (including steelhead), splake and Sunapee trout; trout hybrids; Chinook, coho, Atlantic, and kokanee (blueback) salmon; grayling; whitefish; cisco; crappie; perch; bass; catfish; bullhead; sunfish; sturgeon; northern pike; tiger muskie; walleye and sauger; and burbot (ling).  Bullfrogs and crayfish are also defined as game fish.
IDAPA 13.01.11.201.01 says:  Archery and spear fishing:  Fishing with a bow and arrow, crossbow, spear or mechanical device, excluding firearms.  This type of fishing is permitted only in the taking of bullfrogs and unprotected nongame fish and only in those waters during the season set for the taking of game fish.
F08
 
 
 

answered 2/21/2013

Q: Why is the fish species variety so poor in the Clearwater Region?

there is a lot of interest and curiosity as to why the fish and game haven't stocked walleye into the clearwater region of Idaho, and in fact the variety of fish stalked is poor. I just want to go fishing and not have to unhook deformed, half dead,and starving hatchery trout off my line every time I cast out while I am trying to target the few decent eating species of fish left...i know the hatchery trout serve a purpose with our youth because they are easy to catch and are prey fish in the VERY VERY few bodies of water in idaho that a predatory fish species....BUT does the fish and game have to stock them in every single body of water in this region....why cant there be a predator species and prey species in every lake ....and No the prey species doesnt have to be hatchery trout every time. mix it up a bit to give the people a variety of fish species to target. why cant we stock walleye somewhere in the clearwater region where there is little chance of them escaping and spreading in to other water systems....what happened to stocking catfish and crappie and tiger muskie, perch. and even throw in some golden trout and grayling in the alpine lakes in this region, as this region has ample ample alpine lakes with suitable habitat, but yet it is the only region that has no artic grayling or golden trout according to your historical fish stalking. I think the managers for this region need to start adding variety as every angler I know is tired of catching trout in every body of water, in fact a lot do not even fish this region any more because of this reason....most head south or out of state were there is more opportunity for a variety of fish species....thank you!

A: 

Actually, many wouldn’t consider the diversity of fishes in the Clearwater Region to be poor.  The Clearwater, Snake and Salmon rivers all flow through the Clearwater Region.  As a result, we have many fish species that don’t occur in other regions in the State.  For example, we have anadromous runs of spring, summer, and fall Chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, Coho salmon, steelhead, lamprey and shad that spawn in or migrate through the Clearwater Region.  If you are wondering why there aren’t species such as golden trout, grayling, brown trout, and lake trout in the Clearwater Region, it is because of wilderness area restrictions and the desire to protect wild salmon, steelhead, cutthroat trout, and bull trout populations.  For the most part, in the Clearwater Region, we only stock those trout species in rivers, streams, and high mountain lakes where they already occur.    
 

answered 1/22/2013

Q: Status of Fish in Priest Lake

Is there a review done periodically on the status of fish in Priest Lake? How are the kokanee salmon doing? What are the levels of other fish in the lake?
Thanks for taking my question.

A: 

Each year we count spawnng kokanee around historical shoreline spawning areas.  It gives us a rough index of the adult kokanee population.  This year we saw close to 30,000 fish, which is about 10 times higher than the average of the past 15 years.  That's encouraging, but unfortunately, it doesn't tell us much about what to expect in coming years.  We hope to use a midwater trawl survey this coming year to estimate the population of the younger age classes of kokanee.  We don't have estimates of other species on the lake, but we're planning to do a large-scale lake trout population estimate in 2013-14 as well.  Stay tuned. 

answered 11/29/2012

A: 

It is not legal in Idaho to let your line sit overnight.  Fishing lines must be attended at all times by the person who is fishing.

answered 10/26/2012

A: 

This list includes fish species found to be present in this water during fish surveys. This may not be a complete list of species present in this water. Some species listed here may only be present in small quantities or seasonally.
Black Crappie ,  Brown Bullhead ,  Brown Trout ,  Bull Trout ,  Chinook Salmon ,  Kokanee (Early Spawner) ,  Kokanee (Late Spawner) ,  Largemouth Bass ,  Largescale Sucker ,  Longnose Sucker ,  Northern Pike ,  Northern Pikeminnow ,  Pumpkinseed ,  Rainbow Trout ,  Sculpin (Var. Species) ,  Smallmouth Bass ,  Tench ,  Tiger Musky ,  Westslope Cutthroat Trout ,  Yellow PerchBull Trout are a protected species in Idaho and may be present in this water. If you catch a Bull Trout, it must be released immediately, unharmed, back into the water.

answered 10/26/2012

Q: Is it legal to spear bass sunfish and rainbow trout with a stick?

And what kind are fish legal to spear?

A: 

No.  It is illegal to fish in any waters of Idaho by archery, spearfishing, snagging, hands, and netting except as permitted.
Archery and spearfishing is permitted only in the taking of bullfrogs and unprotected nongame fish and only in those waters during the season set for the taking of game fish.
Please refer to the General Fishing Information (pages 43-49) of the 2011-2012 Fishing Seasons and Rules.
 

answered 10/9/2012

A: 

This is such a broad topic that it is hard to answer here.  It was suggested to me that you should go to a local sporting goods store and talk with them about what works well in your area.

answered 10/1/2012

Q: Does Fish & Game recommends a certain method of slaughtering fish?

There is various information on the internet, much of which seems to be more what people have done, rather than basing it on updated knowledge of fish biology. I would like to know what combination of stunning, killing, dissecting is recommended.

A: 

This is a difficult question to answer because there is no clear definition of "humanely." 
Working in the commercial fish industry, we used to put trout in tanks where we pumped carbon dioxide into the water.  After a short period of time the fish tipped over and we ran them through the processing equipment.  In our salmon and steelhead spawning sites, we use a pneumatic hammer that euthanizes the fish with a sharp blow to the head.  In other states, they rip gill arches and let the fish bleed out.  If fish are not being consumed by humans, there are several approved anesthetics that can be used to put the fish to sleep and then kill the fish.

answered 9/25/2012

Q: Has the Fish and Game ever done any post-stocking survey to determine if the 1979 - 1986 stocking of the Palouse River with 223,002 Brown Trout ever lead to a catchable population of Browns in this River?

Where were these fry and fingerling Browns reared, and what lead to the decision to try to establish a Brown Trout fishery in the Palouse River?

A: 

We've conducted creel surveys and have officer reports that indicate the stocking was marginally successful.  We documented a number of brown trout caught both upstream and downstream of the stocking sites. 
We went many years not stocking brown trout in the Palouse River - mostly because we lost our source of brown trout eggs and discontinued stocking throughout the state.  In 2010, we found an alternative source of brown trout eggs and once again, began stocking brown trout into waters where the once existed.  This includes the Palouse River.

answered 9/24/2012

Q: Follow up Question: How come there are no brook trout lakes identified in the Sawtooth area?

I had already followed your directions but when you do a search as you describe below to find brook trout in the Southwest Region, none of the lakes in the Sawtooth mountains are identified. I have heard about a few lakes in the Sawtooth wilderness that have populations of brook trout but they do not show up when I do a search under other trout.
Thanks,
MM
Even though IDFG doesn't stock brook trout now, why don't you include them in the historical stocking data?
When I search for lakes that were previously stocked with brook trout there is no information. I know brook trout are a non-desired species in Idaho but I would like to be able to find out what lakes were stocked with brook trout in the past. It seems that IDFG doesn't want to aknowledge that brook trout were ever stocked in Idaho.
Your response:
They are included in the database - you just need to do some sluthing. Here is an example: 1) Select Panhandle Region; 2) select records for 1967 to present; 3) click on "other trout;" 4) highlight "Antelope Lake; 5) and now click "search." You will see 2,111 fingerling brook trout were stocked on 5/16/1997 in Antelope Lake.
We stocked brook trout in numerous lakes and streams throughout Idaho in the 1930's. They did so well, they displaced rainbow trout and other native species in many waters. Brook trout are voracious predators and will over-populate leading to a stunted and undesirable population. They also interbreed with native ESA listed bull trout and produce sterile offspring - which decreases the bull trout population.
We've recently pioneered a way to produce sterile brook trout in our hatchery system. You will probably see these fish planted in future years where they will provide a fishery without damaging native fish populations.
....

A: 

A number of the lakes in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area have brook trout populations.  You are not finding them when searching in the Southwest Region because they are all on the Stanley side of the Sawtooths and in the Fish and Game Salmon Region.
Here is a list of lakes in the Salmon Region with Brook Trout populations from the Fishing Planner:
Your searchIDFG Region = Region 7 - Salmon,Cold water fish species = Brook Trout,
Returned the following Waters:
 
 
Alpine Creek
 
Tributary of Alturas Lake Creek
Alpine Creek Lake #14
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Alturas Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Alturas Lake Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Anderson Creek
 
Tributary of Dahlonega Creek
Arnett Creek
 
Tributary of Napias Creek
Asher Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Banner Creek
 
Tributary of Cape Horn Creek
Bayhorse Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Bear Valley Creek
 
Tributary of Middle Fork Salmon River
Beaver Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Beaver Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Big Casino Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Big Creek
 
Tributary of Pahsimeroi River
Big Springs Creek
 
Tributary of Lemhi River
Birdseye Creek
 
Tributary of Silver Creek
Bohannon Creek
 
Tributary of Lemhi River
Born Lakes
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Burnt Creek
 
Tributary of Pahsimeroi River
Burnt Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Buster Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Cabin Creek
 
Tributary of Panther Creek
Cabin Creek
 
Tributary of Perkins Lake
Cabin Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Camp Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Camp Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Cape Horn Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Casino Lakes
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Challis Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Champion Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Champion Lakes
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Champion Lakes
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Crooked Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Crystal Creek
 
Tributary of Beaver Creek
Dahlonega Creek
 
Tributary of North Fork Salmon River
East Fork Valley Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Eddy Creek
 
Tributary of Challis Creek
Elk Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Elk Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Fisher Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Fishhook Creek
 
Tributary of Redfish Lake
Flat Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Fourth of July Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Fourth of July Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Fourth of July Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Frenchman Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Garden Creek
 
Tributary of Hannah Slough
Garden Creek
 
Tributary of Panther Creek
Goat Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Gold Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Goldberg Creek
 
Tributary of Pahsimeroi River
Hell Roaring Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Hell Roaring Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Horse Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Huckleberry Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Hull Creek
 
Tributary of North Fork Salmon River
Iron Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Iron Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Iron Lake #1
 
Middle Salmon-Panther Basin
Knapp Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Knapp Lake #10
 
Upper Middle Fork Salmon Basin
Knapp Lake #11
 
Upper Middle Fork Salmon Basin
Knapp Lake #3
 
Upper Middle Fork Salmon Basin
Knapp Lake #9
 
Upper Middle Fork Salmon Basin
Lake Creek
 
Tributary of Middle Fork Salmon River
Lake Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Lemhi River
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Little Casino Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Lost Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Lost Creek Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Marsh Creek
 
Tributary of Middle Fork Salmon River
Marten Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Meadow Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Meadow Creek
 
Tributary of Goat Creek
Morgan Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Mosquito Flat Reservoir
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Moyer Creek
 
Tributary of Panther Creek
Opal Creek
 
Tributary of Panther Creek
Pahsimeroi River
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Panther Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Perkins Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Pole Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Porphyry Creek
 
Tributary of Panther Creek
Prospect Creek
 
Tributary of Warm Springs Creek
Rabbit Creek
 
Tributary of Napias Creek
Rainbow Creek
 
Tributary of Pole Creek
Rapps Creek
 
Tributary of Arnett Creek
Redfish Lake Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Rough Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Salmon River
East Fork Salmon River to Headwaters
Tributary of Snake River
Salmon River
North Fork Salmon River to East Fork Salmon River
Tributary of Snake River
Sharkey Creek
 
Tributary of Napias Creek
Silver Creek
 
Tributary of Camas Creek
Slate Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Smiley Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Smithy Creek
 
Tributary of Dahlonega Creek
Squaw Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Squaw Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Stanley Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Stanley Lake
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Stanley Lake Creek
 
Tributary of Valley Creek
Swamp Creek
 
Tributary of Owl Creek
Texas Creek
 
Tributary of Lemhi River
Thatcher Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Thompson Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Threemile Creek
 
Tributary of Dahlonega Creek
Trap Creek
 
Tributary of Meadow Creek
Upper Hell Roaring Lake #1
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Upper Hell Roaring Lake #2
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Upper Hell Roaring Lake #3
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Vader Creek
 
Tributary of Marsh Creek
Valley Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Valley Creek Lake #1
 
Upper Salmon Basin
Vat Creek
 
Tributary of Alturas Lake Creek
Warm Springs Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
West Fork Morgan Creek
 
Tributary of Morgan Creek
White Valley Creek
 
Tributary of Challis Creek
Williams Creek
 
Tributary of Salmon River
Williams Lake
 
Middle Salmon-Panther Basin
Winnemucca Creek
 
Tributary of Beaver Creek
Yankee Fork
 
Tributary of Salmon River

 

 

 

answered 9/13/2012

Q: Even though IDFG doesn't stock brook trout now, why don't you include them in the historical stocking data?

When I search for lakes that were previously stocked with brook trout there is no information. I know brook trout are a non-desired species in Idaho but I would like to be able to find out what lakes were stocked with brook trout in the past. It seems that IDFG doesn't want to aknowledge that brook trout were ever stocked in Idaho.

A: 

They are included in the database - you just need to do some sluthing.  Here is an example:  1) Select Panhandle Region; 2) select records for 1967 to present; 3) click on "other trout;" 4) highlight "Antelope Lake; 5) and now click "search."  You will see 2,111 fingerling brook trout were stocked on 5/16/1997 in Antelope Lake.
We stocked brook trout in numerous lakes and streams throughout Idaho in the 1930's.  They did so well, they displaced rainbow trout and other native species in many waters.  Brook trout are voracious predators and will over-populate leading to a stunted and undesirable population.  They also interbreed with native ESA listed bull trout and produce sterile offspring - which decreases the bull trout population.
We've recently pioneered a way to produce sterile brook trout in our hatchery system.  You will probably see these fish planted in future years where they will provide a fishery without damaging native fish populations.

answered 9/13/2012

A: 

No, the current record is over a year old.  You can see all the current records at:   https://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/fish/?getPage=82

answered 8/28/2012

A: 

Henry's Lake is managed with a two trout limit.  No size restrictions apply but once an angler keeps two fish he may not continue to fish. Brook trout are counted in the two fish limit. 

answered 8/20/2012

Q: What are the long term plans for the tiger muskie in the alpine lakes north of McCall?

These lakes used be to be great places to take kids hiking and fishing but now seem to be devoid of life other than a few very large tiger muskie that I have seen cruising these lakes. Will this remain indefinitely or will they be removed and native fish reintroduced at some point. I know the point was to control the Brook trout but they were alot of fun to catch. These lakes from the information I could gather are Twin Lakes, Twin Grassy lakes, Corral lake, Granite Lake, Upper Hazard and several others. It is very dissappointing to see this happen to some great fisheries that my family has enjoyed for 30+ years.

A: 

The tiger muskie plants were part of a fish research project to see if the sterile predators could reduce or eliminate stunted brook trout populations in mnt lakes. The fish wer stocked in 2005 and followed through this summer. They can definately turn a brook trout population around to either eliminate them, it seemed the size of the lake was critical or drastically reduce the number of brook trout and increase individual size of remaining brookies. There are few remaining tiger muskie left and all lakes were restocked with either rainbow or westslope cutthroat trout. Upper Hazrd was left alone,  the treatment was partially successful as far as removal. The brook trout there will come back quickly.

answered 8/6/2012