Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 1 - 25 of 797 questions

A: 

It is unlawful to hunt any big game animals, upland game animals or fur bearing animals with the aid of any artificial light. Some species of animals may be hunted by obtaining a permit.

A Permit to Hunt with Artificial Light is required to hunt predators (only Coyote, Jackrabbit and Skunk) and unprotected animals (animals not classified as game or protected animals).

Permits may be obtained at the Regional Fish and Game office you intend to hunt. Regions consider the potential to injure other people, disturb or kill big game, disturb or damage private property such as buildings, livestock, irrigation systems etc. and trigger complaints of unlawful activity. Permits are very restrictive and require notification to the County Sheriff’s Office and Fish and Game Regional Office for each trip. The permit restricts caliber, light application, distance from residences and campgrounds, season, private property, areas with livestock and cannot be uses during any general or controlled big game season.

Landowners can authorize hunting at night with a spotlight on their privately owned property y by issuing written permission. A hunting license is required. When hunting on private property with written permission a permit from Fish and Game is not required.

answered 1/9/2019

A: 

Congratulations! You are locked in to 2017 prices for 2018.  Just buy your annual license every year for as long as the Price Lock program is active and you will continue to pay 2017 prices each year.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Sorry, but the answer is no. To be part of the Price Lock program, you need to purchase or hold any valid 2017 resident annual license. To continue to stay in the program, you also need to purchase or hold a valid resident annual license in future consecutive years.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

As long as the Price Lock program is active, you may purchase a 3-year resident license any time, or any year, at 2017 prices and receive all the benefits of being locked in. 

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Yes.  To benefit from Price Lock, you will need to buy an annual license each consecutive year after 2017.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

How much you save depends on what tags and permits you usually purchase.  In general, if you buy a 2017 license, you will save 20% on all your items every year you stay in the Price Lock program.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

  • If you are serving in the U.S. military, together with your spouse and children under 18, and are  officially transferred out of state but maintain Idaho as your official state of residence, you are eligible for Price Lock. Proper documentation is required.
  • If you are a fulltime college student attending school out of state but maintain Idaho as your official state of residence, you can still lock in 2017 prices if you didn’t buy a 2017 license.  Proper documentation is required.
  • If you are absent from the state for religious purposes up to two years but maintain Idaho as your official state of residence, you are still eligible for Price Lock. Proper documentation is required.
answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Fees for nonresident sportsmen and women were increased in 2009. At the time, this made Idaho’s nonresident fees higher than other western states. Today, Idaho’s nonresident license, tags, and permits are generally in the middle compared to surrounding states.

answered 6/23/2017

Q: I'm getting the wrong number dialing in to buy an Idaho hunting or fishing license

I tried to dial 1-800-824-3729 like my favorite blog recommended, but that didn't connect to buy a license.

A: 

1-800-824-3729 has been retired for a while as a place to buy licenses from us.

Idaho Fish and Game does have an 800-number for purchasing licenses, but the number above has been retired for this purpose.

 

If you'd like to call-in to buy your hunting or fishing licenses, applications, tags, or permits, then dial: 1-800-554-8685

Most all of the places you'll find this number are in older press releases or in well-meaning blogs or articles that are a little bit out-of-date. 

answered 5/16/2016

A: 

Based on comments we have received from customers over the years, we have changed our process for mailing licenses when they are purchased on-line or through a mobile device. Licenses purchased on-line are to be printed at home and licenses purchased via a mobile device now download electronically to the mobile device used to make the purchase.
If you did not print the license at the time you purchased it on-line, you will need to contact our license section at licenses@idfg.idaho.gov to request a duplicate affidavit be sent to you.

answered 4/27/2016

Q: Bobcat

Why isn't there a limit on harvesting bobcat, like other game animals?

A: 

Bobcats are classified as a furbearing animal.  Furbearers include bobcat, fox, marten, mink, muskrat, beaver, otter, lynx, fisher, and badger.  Of these, lynx and fisher are fully protected with no legal harvest, and otters have a quota.  Lynx are listed as threatened and wolverine are listed as protected non game.   None of the other furbearers have quotas or limits except a few controlled hunts for beaver.  Fur trapping effort fluctuates with fur prices as much as anything.  When fur prices are up, people tend to trap more.  When they are down, people trap less.  License sale fluctuates with fur prices as well.  Bobcat harvest fluctuates with fur prices and they have gone through several cycles over the last few decades and so have bobcat populations.  Recent high harvest has declined likely a result of fur prices declining and reduced trapping pressure.  We continue to monitor annual harvest and survey trappers to identify any concerns for bobcat and other furbearer populations.

answered 4/26/2016

Q: hunter education number

I had an hunter ed number that was my social security number. I requested and have received a new hunter education card from my issuing state that has a number instead of so. sec #.
I would like to change my non-resident ID profile so my social security does not show up on every license I get form Idaho. How do I change the hunter education number from my social sec # (previous) to the new number I have now?
Thanks,
ad

A: 

Idaho Fish and Game issues hunter education numbers at the time of certification, and are generated from the database and are not linked to the social security number and cannot be changed. 
The Idaho Fish and Game license system generates a sportsman's identification number from the database, not the social security number. However, for purchase you need to give your social security number - it is required by the State of Idaho. Your social security number will not print on the license.  

answered 4/17/2016

Q: How can I find prev. years trapping lic purcase? Was a trapping licence required in the early 80's?

With the new trapping course possibly being put on trappers I was wondering when I purchased my first trapping lic. I used to trap back in the early 80"s then joined the service but when retired I started trapping again.

A: 

Thank you for your question.
Trapping licenses were required in the 1980's. Unfortunately we do not have license purchase history for the 1980's.

answered 4/17/2016

A: 

Thanks for the question,
The short answer is no.  Years ago, the Kokanee fishery in Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir (SFCR) was integral to the fishing experience in the reservoir.  In the late 90's we started to see a decline in angler catch rates.  This decline continued to worsen over the next 5-7 years to the point where, despite stocking the same number and with the same stock of Kokanee, we saw no improvement in angler catch rates.  We didn't want to give up, but we believed the predator load (Walleye, Smallmouth Bass, Northen Pike Minnow) simply ovewhelmed the stocked kokanee.  So, we doubled stocking densities (at considerable costs) for 2 years and then monitored the fishery.  No luck.  They dissappeared, and the double stocking densities ocurred at considerable cost to the anglers (license dollars). At that point, we did not see the sense in spending license dollars feeding predators in SFCR, so we discontinued the program.
We have not revisited the hatchery stocking program since then, and have no reason to believe conditions have improved to where a hatchery kokanee based fishery would prosper.
We wish we could make it happen, but at this point in time, the precious hatchery kokanee are being used in fisheries known to produce kokanee fishing opportunities.
Please contact the region directly if you have additional questions or would like clarifications.  208-324-4359.
 

answered 4/12/2016

Q: Do I need a trappers license to trap rats?

I getting some pack rats at my work location, do I need a trapping license to trap out these rats?

A: 

No you do not.  Thanks for asking!

answered 4/11/2016

Q: Can I complete Oregon's hunter education if I'm an Idaho resident?

Can I complete the Oregon hunter's education course, if I'm an Idaho resident, and have never taken it?

A: 

A hunter education certification from another state would qualify for purchasing a hunting license in Idaho. This includes online and instructor-led courses. States vary whether they accept non-residents into hunter education courses. To find out contact the hunter education program in the state where you plan on taking hunter education.

answered 4/5/2016

Q: feral cats

Do I need a trappers license to live catch feral cats in my own yard to protect my chickens?

A: 

No Fish and Game issued trapping license is needed to catch ferrel cats on your property.  Ferel cats would not be classified as wildlife and would not fall under Fish and game jurisdiction.
 
Ferel cats fall under state, county and city jurisdiction, and therefore you should be aware of animal abuse laws.
 
I would consult with animal control agents in your local jurisdiction
 
 
 

answered 3/26/2016

A: 

No birds may be shot without a license. Unprotected non-native species, such as European Starlings and Eurasian Collared-doves, may be taken year-round by those possessing a valid hunting license.

answered 3/22/2016

Q: Non resident disabled veterans license

Can I email my proof of disability to you? I have scanned the document with copy of my drivers license.
Thank you,
Brett Wanner
Army Veteran.

A: 

You can e-mail your proof of disability, letter on Veterans Affairs letterhead showing combined service connected disability percentage, to licenses@idfg.idaho.gov.

answered 3/19/2016

Q: Is it legal to take a photo of fishing license to show proof of purchase?

With todays age of personnel electronics. Would it be legal to use a photo on my phone to show proof of purchase for a hunting or fishing license? Since we can print our license at home if we purchase online. And is IFG looking into having an app. that will show proof?

A: 

Thank you for your question.
Yes, you may take a picture of your license and store it on your mobile device as proof of having a license.
We do not have any plans to build an app for licensing. However, we do have a mobile optimized website and those who purchase their license via a mobile device now download their license to their mobile device rather than receiving a printed license.
Please contact us again if you have additional questions.
 

answered 3/15/2016

Q: Ground Squirrel/Whistle Pig

Can you shoot Whistle Pigs without a hunting licence?

A: 

A hunting license IS required to hunt or take any wildlife in Idaho, including unprotected and predatory wildlife.
Most ground squirrels are classified as unprotected wildlife and can be hunted by persons holding a valid hunting license.  Be aware, there are several species of ground squirrel that are protected.
We recommend you call the regional office near the area you wish to hunt prior to hunting.
See the maps and descriptions at the following link for locations of huntable ground squirrels: https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/ground-squirrel

answered 3/15/2016

Q: Permit question

What is the difference between three day License and permit for $37.50 opposed to the steelhead permit for $25.75? If they both have a three day license then what is the benefit for the more expensive permit?

A: 

There is a difference between the Steelhead Permit and the 3-day Salmon/Steelhead.   The 3-day Salmon/Steelhead is a 3-day Fishing License with a Salmon Permit and a Steelhead Permit.   The Steelhead Permit cannot be purchased unless you have a Nonresident Fishing LIcense.  As of the date this question is being answered (3/16/16) the total cost for a Nonresident Fishing License and the Steelhead Permit would be $124.00.  These items would be good for the calendar year instead of just 3 days.

answered 3/15/2016

Q: Nonresident gun carry

Do i have to obtain some sort of licence to hunt rabbits, etc., on public ground?

A: 

Yes you need to have  a current hunting license to hunt rabbits in Idaho.

answered 2/28/2016

Q: coyote hunting with a crossbow

Is it legal to use a crossbow to hunt coyote's?

A: 

Yes, coyotes are classified as predatory wildlife in the state of Idaho and may be taken in any numbers, year round, and with crossbows, by the holders of the appropriate hunting license. The weapons restrictions that exist for big game do not apply to predatory or unprotected wildlife.
 
Josh Royse

answered 2/27/2016

Q: Do I need a state hunting license to shoot starlings on my farm in kuna idaho for pest control?

I have a major starling problem on my 40 ac farm in kuna idaho. I want to work on reducing them and protect my crops. I don't have a hunting license currently but I was wondering if its legal to shoot the non protected non game birds.

A: 

Starlings are classified in Idaho as a predator and can be controlled by almost any means, but a license or permit is required for the individual doing the control action.
 
However the depredation control folks at Wildlife Services (208-373-1630) can help control migratory wildlife which are depredating on crops.
 

answered 2/14/2016