Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 1 - 12 of 12 questions

Q: Can you use eurasian doves for trapping bait

Can you use eurasian doves for trapping bait, long as they can not be seen from the air?

A: 

Yes, however if any part of the dove up to and including feathers becomes dislodged or visable then it would be considered exposed bait and if the traps were closer than 30 there would be a violation of trapping too close to exposed bait.

answered 9/16/2015

Q: How close to city limits, side of roads, and country houses can you shoot doves?

It seems like all the doves are inside city limits with a few outside of them, I live in Rupert, Idaho and just outside the city limits. When I am driving in the country I see a lot of doves on power lines (i never shoot at power lines but wait for them to fly to into a safe zone, like a field then shoot) and I want to pull over and take them, but I don't. I feel nervous if a house a 1/2 mile away or if the bird flies out into the field is it trespassing? Where I go and dove hunt is pretty far away from the city and houses, but no doves!
I guess what im asking is, if I'm out in the country with field around me, as long as I don't shoot on the road or over the road can shoot as they fly into the field and retrieve them legally? How close to city limits can I shoot? How far from a building or a house in the country do i have to be to be able to shoot? If that is not an option, where can I hunt doves that the doves will be?

A: 

This is a very broad category with too many questions to accurately address in this message.  I encourage you to contact your local police station, county sheriff's office, or local conservation officer to help explain the details surrounded each circumstances.  Idaho does not have a state law regarding a distance required from a building for discharge of a firearm.  However, some cities and counties have adopted ordinances.  Please check with the city or county you are hunting in or near.  Public land next to agricultural areas frequenly have doves.
It is unlawful to shoot from or across the traveled portion, shoulders or embankments of any road maintained by any government entity. 
Fields that are cultivated or irrigated do not have to be posted; you must get permission even though it is not signed. You would need permission from the landowner to retreive dove that fall on private property. 

answered 10/6/2014

Q: Hunt doves over grain placed for ag use?

I have permission to hunt a field for doves. The farmer just placed a grain pile in that field so he could feed his critters with it. Now the doves are flocking to it. Is it legal to hunt them there? The intent is to feed critters not the doves.

A: 

Hunting over placed bait is not legal; 2014 and 2015 Seasons and Rules for Upland Game, Furbearer & Turkey page 21. 
Dove's are  migratory birds.  Please review the 2014 Waterfowl Seasons and Rules, page 13, for more detailed information regarding bait.

answered 9/25/2014

Q: Black's Creek Reservoir

Is Black's Creek Reservoir open to dove, quail, and waterfowl hunting for fall/winter of 2014/2015 season?

A: 

Public land around Black's Creek Reservoir, outside of any administrative areas such as parks, boat ramps, etc., are open for access.  There has been issues with vandalism around the outlet area in the past and road access is restricted. The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has not closed any bird hunting in that geographic area.  Water levels may affect waterfowl abuandance in the area.  Please honor any Safety Zone postings to provide public safety to other users.

answered 9/25/2014

Q: 2014 Dove Season

With the constantly increasing numbers of the Eurasian collared doves and what appears to be a smaller number of mourning doves with this encroachment, what is justifying the doubling of the season in both duration and bag limits?

A: 

Idaho Fish and Game has adopted the season recommendation approved by the Pacific Flyway Council and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. These recommendations are the result of a new harvest strategy, which represents a more informative approach to managing harvest of mourning doves as envisioned in the Mourning Dove National Strategic Harvest Management Plan approved by the Flyway Councils in 2003. This new strategy is based on band returns from hunter-harvested doves, which are then used to predict mourning dove abundance. The new season structure allows more opportunity, while conserving mourning dove populations and minimizing annual regulatory change.
The Idaho Fish and Game Commission approved the new season structure in Idaho during a July 2014 meeting; six months after the Upland Game Hunting Regulations were published.
While Eurasian collared doves have undoubtedly increased over time, we are unaware of any detrimental impacts to mourning doves. Eurasian-collared doves may be taken in any amounts and at any time by holders of the appropriate valid Idaho hunting or combination hunting license, provided such taking is not in violation of state, county, or city laws, ordinances or regulations. 

answered 9/1/2014

Q: 2014 Dove Season

I read an article in the local newspaper that dove season was going to be 2 months instead of 1 and the limit now 15 birds. However, as I log on to the website today (8/8/14) and look at the regulations, it is still showing the 2014 season as 1 month and 10 birds.
Does the new season have to be formally adopted still? It seems like you would take the old ones off the website if the decision has already been made...?
Thank you for clearing this up,
Jess Simonds

A: 

No.  In early July, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission approved the earliest and most liberal mourning dove season allowed. The 2014 dove season will last 60 days, from September 1 through October 30. The daily bag limit will be 15 birds and the possession limit will be 45.
The information from the website was taken from the rules rooks which were printed in January.  The website will be updated soon to reflect these changes.

answered 8/8/2014

Q: [Injured] mourning dove [bird] in my yard

There is a injured baby mourning dove in my yard is it ok to nurse it back to health or take it to a vet? What can I do to help it so that I don't have to watch it suffer?

A: 

Thank you for caring about Idaho's wildlife. In the case of injured wildlife where a timely response can be critical and you're not comfortable with the situation, we encourage you to contact your regional office. If it's outside of normal business hours and you deem it an emergency, you can contact your local sheriff's office.
If you're comfortable doing so and the bird appears to be dazed due to a window strike, you can learn more information in this Windows to Wildlife issue.
Also, one could contact Animals in Distress's through their 24-7 hotline: (208) 367-1026.
Unfortunately, we can't respond as quickly as we would like to in these requests online. However, we hope to provide better information for this type of situation on our website this coming summer 2014.
Thanks again for your concern for Idaho's wildlife.
 

answered 3/19/2014

A: 

Yes.  Many dove hunters have enjoyed the opportunity provided by eurasian-collared doves.  They are a litte bigger than mourning doves and should provide a little more meat than the standard mourning dove.  Eurasian-collared doves are classified as 'unprotected' and can be hunted and taken all year.  They may be taken in any amounts and at any time by holders of the appropriate valid hunting license, provided such taking is not in violation of state, county, or city laws, ordinances or regulations.

answered 9/4/2012

A: 

You will need a hunting license and a Federal Migratory Game Bird Harvest Information Program Validation.  For more information see the mourning dove section of the Upland Game rules at  http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/docs/rules/uplandDoveCraneInfo.pdf

answered 9/1/2012

A: 

Yes. The mourning dove season opens September 1, and in addition to a 2010 hunting license, hunters must have a federal "Migratory Game Bird Harvest Information Program Validation," migratory bird permit for short - not a duck stamp. It costs $1.75 for resident hunters and $4.75 for nonresidents. For more details see the 2010-2011 & 2011-2013 Upland Game, Furbearer and Turkey rules brochure.

answered 8/8/2010

A: 

Dove hunting, which begins September 1, requires a federal migratory bird permit ($1.50). The $15 federal waterfowl permit (required for duck and goose hunting) is not required to hunt doves. The $1.50 permit is required for hunting doves, sandhill cranes, ducks and geese.IDFG

answered 8/29/2004

A: 

Dove hunting, which begins September 1, requires a federal migratory bird permit ($1.50). But the $15 federal waterfowl stamp is not required to hunt doves. The $1.50 permit is required for doves, sandhill cranes, ducks and geese.

answered 8/24/2003