Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 3526 - 3550 of 3552 questions

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A. When you buy a deer tag or an elk tag, the license machine will print out a report form. Fill it out and mail it in within ten days of harvest only if you are successful. There is no supertag drawing with this hunting season and reporting method.

answered 7/30/2000

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No, you can pick it up anytime up until the hunt closes, at any license vendor. It will cost $6.50 for the permit, plus the cost of the tag. If you already have a general-season tag, you will need to exchange it for the controlled hunt tag. For an exchange, you must go to (or mail your tag to) a Fish and Game office. There IS a deadline for this of August 29 or the general season opening. See pages six, seven and 15 of the 2000 big game rules.

answered 7/23/2000

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A number of years ago, the department did publish such a book which was extremely popular with many anglers but irked a lot of others whose favorite secret trout lake was revealed. As backcountry use increased, the department decided for biological reasons that it was best to stop printing a guide that potentially could bring too much pressure on sensitive fishing resources. Many old-time Idaho anglers still have a copy in their fishing libraries-usually guarded tighter than the family silver-that they might let you see. Not much has changed in alpine fisheries over the years and the high country is still the right place to be this time of year.

answered 7/6/2000

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You can shoot cans or other targets without a license. You actually need a license long before you shoot at an animal. If you are pursuing any animal with the intent of shooting it, you are hunting, and so need a license at that time.

answered 6/29/2000

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No, you can plink cans, or shoot targets without a license. As soon as you shoot at an animal, you need a license.

answered 6/22/2000

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Crawfish or crayfish or crawdads are found throughout Idaho. We have identified at least 4 species of the Genus Pacifastacus that are found from small higher elevation streams to lowland lakes and the Snake River as it flows out of Idaho. If you want to catch crayfish legally in Idaho, you need a valid fishing license, or be young enough not to require one. They are typically caught in a minnow or crayfish trap that is baited with some food for them to eat. Horses don't fit well into the traps, so chicken gizzards or fish parts are commonly used as bait. All traps must have a tag bearing the owner's name and address. It is legal to fish with up to 5 traps no larger than 18" x 12" x 12" (see page 7 of the 2000-2001 fishing rules for more information).Crayfish are found in the Boise area rivers. Places that have abundant crayfish (the Snake River and impoundments from Idaho Falls to Hells Canyon) also have commercial fishing allowed after the purchase of the appropriate fishing license. The crayfish market is very poor, however, and only one person has purchased a commercial license this year. C.J. Strike and Hells Canyon reservoirs have been the most popular places over the last 10 years to catch crayfish.

answered 6/15/2000

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All resident deer and elk tags go on sale July 25, except elk tags in the Middle Fork, Selway and Lolo zones. They will be available August 1. Because there is a limited number of these elk tags, they will be sold on a first come-first served basis. They are expected to sell fast. To make it fair in both Idaho time zones, they will go on sale at 10:00 a.m. in the Mountain Time Zone and 9:00 a.m. in the Pacific Zone.

answered 6/8/2000

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Brook trout are an introduced species that is very prolific and competes with native trout for food and habitat. Reducing the competition is the objective of this limit. Actually, the rule is "ten in addition to the trout limit" so if your first six trout were brook trout, you could be going home with 16 of them altogether.

answered 6/1/2000

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Yes, as long as it has no barbs, or the barbs have been bent completely closed.

answered 5/25/2000

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Yes. As soon as she completes Hunter's Education, a license can be issued so she can apply for controlled hunts. The license will specify that it is valid only on and after her birthday.

answered 5/18/2000

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Fish and Game needs some information in an effort to improve the catchable rainbow trout we plant in some Idaho waters. If the tag has "$$ 10 $$" on it, you're and instant $10 winner. Otherwise, turning in the tag information places you in a drawing for $50. It is cheaper (and more fun) to reward anglers for turning in tags than to gather this information some other way. If you caught a trout with a tag, send your name, address, phone number, date and location fish was caught and the flattened tag (or just the number, if you want to keep the tag) to IDFG Fisheries Research, P.O. Box 428, Jerome, ID 83338.

answered 5/11/2000

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We have to have the Social Security number because it is an Idaho law. Idaho Code, Section 73-122 states "the social security number of an applicant shall be recorded on any application for a professional, occupational, and recreational license." This law has been in effect for several years and has been unpopular with many Fish and Game license buyers. At least one Idaho legislator has vowed to try to exempt Fish and Game licenses from the law in a coming session of the legislature, something you might want to watch for and support.

answered 5/4/2000

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New laws do generally go into effect July 1, but in the case of these license and fee changes, the effective date is indeed May 1. Lawmakers understood that the financial crisis at Fish and Game needed urgent remedy and agreed on a May 1 effective date. If you buy before May 1, you may save significant money on this year's licenses and tags. A lifetime license is a particularly attractive deal before May 1.

answered 4/27/2000

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The next sign up for the Boise and surrounding areas will be July 12, 2000 at the Southwest Region Office, 3101 South Powerline Rd. in Nampa, and July 13, 2000 at the Hunter Education Center, 109 W 44th Street, in Garden City. Students can sign up between noon and 8:00 PM on those days. All classes offered at the April registration have been filled.For other registration dates and times contact your local regional office

answered 4/20/2000

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The easiest way is to call a taxidermist. If you're looking for an organic method, there's a critter called dermistic beetles that will clean them up. If you rely on ants, beetles, or other insects be sure it is in a wire cage of some kind to foil the bigger animals. Cooking may be the most common method. Remove what you can first. Hold the water temperature below a boil so you don't yellow the bone or loosen the teeth. Cook and scrape. Cook and scrape.

answered 4/13/2000

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Yes. With every big game animal except mountain lions, you are required to bring out the meat. This is addressed under "Waste of game" on page 11 of the 1999 big game rules and on page 10 of the 2000 big game rules.

answered 4/6/2000

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No. Residents or nonresidents must have a hunting license to hunt anywhere in Idaho, even if it is in a depredation hunt, landowner appreciation hunt, or landowner permission hunt. If you are hunting something that requires a tag, you must have that, also.

answered 3/23/2000

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It says in the rules brochure that you will be notified by the end of March, however, you can look it up now on the Fish and Game website. It is the first item under "What's New?" Results in the drawing for spring black bear hunts are also available. The address is: http://www.state.id.us/fishgame.

answered 3/9/2000

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The application period is April 1 - April 30. The rules brochure, with application work sheet inside, is available now at Fish and Game offices and license vendors. It is a two-year brochure which covered 1999 and 2000. During the application period you can apply at a license vendor, by mailing in the worksheet (or a photocopy), over the telephone (1-800-824-3729), or on the Internet at: http://www.state.id.us/fishgame/purchase.htmIf you apply over the telephone or on the Internet, you may use Visa, MasterCard or Discover credit cards. There will be an additional fee charged by the contractor processing the order.

answered 3/2/2000

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The F&G BBS started in the early 90s when that was the cutting edge of technology. Now, most of the world has gone to the Internet for electronic information. F&G can save a few bucks each month by cutting off the phone line that the BBS used. The website address is: http://www.state.id.us/fishgame

answered 2/24/2000

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Yes, he can actually buy a hunting license at age 11 IF he has completed the required hunter education course. However, he can not use the license to hunt until he turns 12.

answered 2/17/2000

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For your own safety. Idaho Code section 36-1509 specifies this. There are exceptions, such as the one on Bear Lake in the Southeast Region, where any sized hole may be cut to go after cisco with a dip net.

answered 2/10/2000

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This year you can buy three. The first is the general spring tag which is valid in any general season hunt from April 15 to May 15. The second spring tag is good in general hunts from May 10 to May 25. The third tag is good in fall general turkey seasons. If you have a tag, and then are drawn for a controlled hunt, you need to send your tag to Fish and Game to exchange it for the proper controlled hunt permit and tag. Spring general tags may be exchanged for spring controlled hunts, fall tags for fall controlled hunts. You can apply for controlled hunts in both spring and fall. You can exchange a spring for a fall tag or vice-versa up until April 15. A fee of $3.50 is charged.

answered 2/3/2000

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If you're plinking tin cans or targets, you don't even need a license. But if you are walking around hunting ANY animal, you need a valid Idaho hunting license. This includes frequently-hunted unprotected species such as jackrabbits, ground squirrels and coyotes.

answered 1/20/2000