Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 3501 - 3525 of 3552 questions

A: 

Not to hunt, but within ten days after the end of the season you must get the pelt tagged at a regional Fish and Game office, the McCall office, or a designated checkpoint. The tags are $2 each. An additional $1.50 vendor fee will also be charged each person bringing in pelts for tagging.

answered 1/21/2001

A: 

The answer is no. The rule still reads that if you apply for a moose, goat, or sheep hunt you can not apply in any other controlled hunt drawing, except unlimited hunts, bear or turkey hunts, "extra" hunts or depredation hunts. The nonresident tags we residents can buy are for general seasons only, and they go on sale September 1, long after the drawings.

answered 1/14/2001

A: 

Yes, the use of archery equipment is legal in the taking of wild turkey. However, archers should note that crossbows are not allowed. No additional permits or validations are required to use archery equipment while wild turkey hunting. Hunters should have a valid current year Idaho hunting license and a spring wild turkey tag. For more information on Idaho's spring turkey seasons and rules pick up the 2000 Wild Turkey Hunting Seasons booklet, contact the nearest Fish and Game office or visit the Department's Internet website at http://www.state.id.us/fishgame.

answered 1/7/2001

A: 

You can lookup your results and print a new card at this location: https://idfg.idaho.gov/hed-dupe

answered 1/1/2001

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It opens January 1, but probably won't get real good until sometime later in January, and in February for the Clearwater, and in March for the Salmon River. Be sure to buy your 2001 license and steelhead permit. The fishing rules brochure tells which streams or segments have no seasons or different seasons.

answered 12/25/2000

A: 

Your Idaho license is good until the end of the year, December 31. Some seasons run over into 2001, for instance, chukar and gray partridge, waterfowl and rabbits. You will need a new hunting license January 1. Your federal duck stamp is good for the 2001 part of the season.

answered 12/17/2000

A: 

You cannot legally shoot big game from a motorized vehicle of any kind and that includes boats. It is legal to shoot from kayaks, canoes, and other non-motorized boats, but it is not considered to be a safe practice.You can legally shoot waterfowl from a motorboat or sailboat. The engine must be completely shut off and/or the sail furled, and the boat's progress in the water completely stopped before you shoot.

answered 12/10/2000

A: 

Yes. It's very unusual, but happens every now and then. That's what protects you from a fine when rules are written "antlered only" or "antlerless only" in restricted hunts. You might not be close enough to actually discern the sex, or the angle might be wrong, but you can sure see the antlers if they are there.

answered 12/3/2000

A: 

Only turn it in if you were successful. The supertag drawing has been eliminated, because only those who harvest a deer or elk are required to report. Forms which were pre-printed for last year were used up this year, and they still had the message about the drawing.

answered 11/26/2000

A: 

Yes. B tag elk hunts in the Selway and Middle Fork zones have been extended until November 30, as have some deer controlled hunts and some controlled hunts for trophy species. The extensions were a response to fire-related closures of the areas earlier in the year. More specific information is on the Fish and Game website under What's New and then "Fire Information."

answered 11/19/2000

A: 

You are correct, the prices in the book are wrong. It was printed late last year, prior to the fee increases approved by the Legislature in the spring. It was reprinted in July, and the prices in the front of the book were updated, but on the steelhead page (14) a list of the old prices was overlooked. You need a fishing license and a $11.50 steelhead permit. The permit can't be used with a one-day license. If you are a nonresident, you can get a three-day permit that includes a general fishing license for $28.50. Kids under 14 don't need a permit if they fish with someone who has one and record their harvest on that person's permit. Residents under 14 can buy a permit and have their own limit.Steelhead fishing is really heating up, and you can get weekly catch rates and river conditions on the Fish and Game website under "What's New."

answered 11/12/2000

A: 

No. There is no provision in state code or Fish and Game rules for exchange of deer tags after the beginning of the season. However, you can buy a nonresident deer tag for the Clearwater area for $235. Seasons run until mid-late November, or use your regular deer tag in the Panhandle area where some seasons run until December 1.

answered 11/5/2000

A: 

December 1, resident and nonresident licenses will be available, as well as nonresident general-season tags.

answered 10/29/2000

A: 

Tips given to the Citizen's Against Poaching organization are very helpful in helping to apprehend a variety of miscreants. Information such as vehicle descriptions and license plate numbers have helped in many instances. All information given to CAP is completely confidential and you can remain anonymous unless you are willing to testify in court. To report a poacher, call 1-800-632-5999. If you do not reach an operator, please leave a message and your call will be returned.

answered 10/22/2000

A: 

No, the rules on fishing specifically prohibit fishing with two poles for salmon or steelhead.

answered 10/15/2000

A: 

There are for big game hunting. In the state Administrative Procedures Act rules section for Fish and Game, section 13.01.08 is "Rules governing the taking of big game animals." It specifies that it is unlawful to hunt big game "with any electronic device attached to, or incorporated in, the firearm (including handguns and shotguns) or scope." A following line applies similar restrictions to archery equipment.

answered 10/9/2000

A: 

Yes, go to the Fish and Game website at www.state.id.us/fishgame and select "Wildlife," then scroll down to the link titled "Idaho Big Game Records". Here you can find the complete listing of Idaho's big game records through 1999. It includes deer, elk, antelope, cougar, bear, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, and moose.

answered 10/1/2000

A: 

The federal framework allows only a certain number of days in duck season. By putting the two-day split in midweek, the Commission gained another weekend at the end of the season.

answered 9/24/2000

A: 

Duck and goose season both open October 7. Limits are the same as last year. The special youth season will be Sept. 23 and 24. A licensed hunter over 18 must accompany each kid, and the oldsters can't hunt, just help and teach. Getting the duck book printed is about the toughest deadline each year. The Commission has to set the seasons at the August meeting because the federal framework must be in place prior to setting seasons. Then staff has to typeset the book and get it to the printer. The printer's due date this year was August 25, the day the Commission met. Having missed that date, there is a delay in printing. It should be at license vendors by the last week of September.

answered 9/14/2000

A: 

You heard correct. The Commission passed the leftover tag rule after the book was printed, so the book is incorrect. You will be charged nonresident price for your nonresident deer or elk tag.

answered 9/10/2000

A: 

You sure do. The harvest information program permit is required for anyone who hunts waterfowl, snipe, sandhill cranes, or doves. It helps the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service keep track of populations and harvest throughout the range of these migratory birds.

answered 9/4/2000

A: 

For upland birds, you only need a hunting license, unless you hunt sage or sharptail grouse, which have a special $1.50 permit to gather information on hunter numbers and harvest. For waterfowl, you need a license, a federal duck stamp, and federal harvest information permit. The state upland and waterfowl permits have gone away, and those programs will be funded from the increase in hunting license fees approved by the 2000 Legislature.

answered 8/27/2000

A: 

Beginning this year, hunters out after sage grouse or sharp-tailed grouse need to have their license validated for those species. The $1.50 validation is not just another permit. Sharp-tailed grouse have been proposed for listing as an endangered species, and sage grouse numbers have declined and they could be considered for listing soon. The Fish and Game Commission adopted the permit requirement to allow Department biologists to get more detailed information on Idaho sage and sharp-tailed grouse hunting. The Department will contact hunters with the validation after the season to determine their harvest and where they hunted. Gathering this information is aimed at keeping these species off the endangered species list and available for hunting.

answered 8/20/2000

A: 

Fish and Game has not, and does not plan to, close any hunts because of fire. If a land management agency closes access to everyone because of extreme fire danger in an area, Fish and Game will support that decision. Right now, there is no complete elk zone or controlled hunt which has been burned. You may have to move your traditional camp or hunt area to another location within the zone or hunt area for which your tag is good. Deer hunters shouldn't worry because their tags are good in multiple units. To get the latest information on fires in Idaho, look under "What's New" on the Fish and Game website: http://www.state.id.us/fishgame/firepage.htm.

answered 8/13/2000

A: 

There are several reservoirs across the southern part of Idaho which have salvage orders now, and likely to be more due to the lack of rain. The most common salvage order lifts the bag, possession, and size limits, but other requirements, like tackle restrictions, remain. A salvage order is always directed at a specific body of water, and may liberalize tackle restrictions. If you have a question about a specific location, or want to know if there are any salvage orders effective in your area, call your regional Fish and Game office.

answered 8/6/2000