Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 3451 - 3475 of 3552 questions

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The turkey seasons and rules booklet for 2002 has just been delivered to vendors and Fish and Game offices all over Idaho. The contents of the booklet have been available for some time on the department web site at http://www2.state.id.us/fishgame/.Bear seasons and rules are included in the 2001 big game proclamation booklet.

answered 1/13/2002

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Big game seasons will not be set by the Fish and Game Commission until March. The proclamation booklet will be available at vendors, Fish and Game offices and on the Fish and Game Internet web site in April.

answered 1/6/2002

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Besides Fish and Game at www2.state.id.us/fishgame, try the "Digital Atlas of Idaho" at Idaho State University, http://imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/ Then select the "Biology" link and the type of animals you want information about.

answered 12/27/2001

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Mid April. You have to notify Fish and Game which tag you want (deer, elk or antelope) by May 1. If you draw, the tag you buy can be used in any open hunt for that species, anywhere in the state.

answered 12/25/2001

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Yes. Limits will remain the same at three per day, nine in possession and 40 for the season if you buy a second steelhead permit.

answered 12/16/2001

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How do I apply for it?A. The Big Game regulations contain information and applications for depredation hunts. You have to fill out the application and send it in to the Fish and Game office in the region you want to hunt. All applications received from May 1 through June 30 are put in random order. All applications received after that will be placed at the end of the list. Only residents can apply. The applications will be kept on file through the following June 30.

answered 12/9/2001

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Yes. A company called GreatLodge.com has a contract to sell licenses and tags online. You can reach it from either the hunting or fishing license menus on the Fish and Game website, http://www2.state.id.us/fishgame.

answered 12/2/2001

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No. It means others can't hunt on it. Saying "no hunting" is kind of an invitation to not even bother asking.

answered 11/18/2001

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The actual property title is in the name of Fish and Game, but you are technically correct about the benefit of the public. All the land owned by the department is managed to accomplish the statutorial charge of the department, which is to preserve, protect and perpetuate the wildlife of Idaho to provide a continued supply of wildlife for hunting, fishing and trapping. The Nature Center is an educational facility to show the public how Fish and Game does that and it also shows private landowners how they can enhance wildlife. The sign is there because many visitors mistakenly think that it is owned by the former Morrison-Knudsen Company. That name remains on it because of a substantial contribution the company made during the construction of the center.

answered 11/12/2001

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No. The only legal weapons in a season designated "short range weapons only" are muzzleloader, archery equipment, crossbow and shotgun using slugs or shot size 00 or larger.

answered 11/4/2001

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Nonresident tags may be sold only at the prices specified in Idaho Code section 36-416, which are set by legislation. The law doesn't make a provision for lowering the price when the tag is sold to a resident.

answered 10/28/2001

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The Commission increased the limits in August to three per day, nine in possession and 40 for the season. An angler must purchase a second steelhead card keep the season limit of 40.

answered 10/21/2001

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In most cases, not after August 29. If the season has opened in the hunt you want to leave, no exchange is allowed. About the only exchange available now is for folks who could not hunt due to the terrorist attack on September ll.

answered 10/14/2001

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You can't take big game animals with any weapon that has any kind of electronic device attached to or incorporated in it. This includes rifles, shotguns, pistols and archery equipment. This does not apply to shooting unprotected wildlife, upland game and birds or the furbearers for which hunting is allowed.

answered 10/8/2001

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The rules booklet states that during a muzzleloader-only season, a weapon must be without any electronic device attached to, or incorporated on, the muzzleloader.

answered 9/30/2001

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Yes. Coyotes are classified as predators in Idaho law, and there is no restriction on killing them. You do need a valid Idaho hunting license.

answered 9/23/2001

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Many hunters make the mistake of thinking they can use salt water, for example, to attract deer or elk. Whether you can "see" an attractant or not is irrelevant. The regulation states it is unlawful to hunt "any game animal/bird by means of baiting with grain, salt in any form (liquid or solid), or any other substance (except liquid scents) to constitute an attraction or enticement, with the exception of applicable rules for the black bear baiting permit. The phrase "except liquid scents" DOES mean you can use items such as commercial deer scent, such as BUCKRUT or DOE-IN-HEAT. These are smell attractants to be distinguished from food items.

answered 9/16/2001

A: 

Although feral swine have been detected in areas of Idaho in the past, there has not been any verified evidence of their continued presence since early 2011.  Nonetheless, feral swine pose a serious threat to habitat and native wildlife and Fish and Game fully supports the "Squeal on Pigs" campaign administered in Idaho by the State Department of Agriculture.  Anybody seeing feral swine are encouraged to report sightings to the "Squeal on Pigs" hotline number [1-888-268-9219].

answered 9/9/2001

A: 

You can take a gun to shoot a bear. Just remember not to shoot your deer or elk with the gun. You would be wise to leave your bow in camp when carrying a gun for bear. Otherwise, your fellow archers are likely to report you for hunting with a gun during an archery hunt, not realizing that you are out for bear.

answered 9/3/2001

A: 

Fees were increased last year, at the same time that the legislation authorizing the upland game and waterfowl stamps expired. Fish and Game decided not to try to renew the stamp legislation, but instead will fund those habitat programs out of the general fee increase. Bottom line: You only need a state permit validation for sage and/or sharptail grouse ($1.50). You need a WMA pheasant permit ($21.50) if you are 17 or older and want to hunt pheasants on the Wildlife Management Areas where pheasants are stocked. You need a federal duck stamp to hunt waterfowl and a federal Harvest Information Program validation ($1.50) to hunt any migratory bird, including doves.

answered 8/26/2001

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Yes, unsold nonresident deer and elk tags will be made available to residents beginning September 1. They will be sold at nonresident prices.

answered 8/20/2001

A: 

Yes, for deer, elk and antelope hunters the report is required. As well as mail, there are plans for phone, fax and internet reporting. We'll keep you posted as numbers and addresses are secured.

answered 8/12/2001

A: 

Yes.You can exchange it for one in another zone at a Fish and Game office, for $3.50. One exchange is allowed. The deadline is Aug. 29, or earlier if the season in your zone opens earlier. If the new zone has a quota, there have to be tags available for you to exchange.

answered 8/6/2001

A: 

On the Fish and Game web site, www.state.id.us/fishgame, select "Fishing" then "fish stocking." The next page will give you a link to information about where fish will be stocked this year, another to stocking history, and one to hatchery information. In the stocking history page, you can select a search by species, the name of the stream or lake, the county or the hatchery.

answered 7/29/2001