Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 3426 - 3450 of 3552 questions

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There are classes scheduled in most parts of the state before fall hunting begins. Some regions are registering for classes soon, so contact your regional Fish and Game office for times and places.

answered 7/14/2002

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For almost everyone, August 1 is the first day for buying general hunt tags. Tags are available from more than 400 private license vendors in Idaho and from all Fish and Game offices. For those few hunts that begin August 1, tags can be obtained two weeks in advance.

answered 7/7/2002

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License vendors can print out a list for you. Or, you can go to the Fish and Game web site at http://www2.state.id.us/fishgame/hunt/ch/leftover.htm for a list. Leftover controlled hunt permits go on sale at 10 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time, 9 a.m. Pacific, July 15.

answered 6/30/2002

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Nope, not required. However, this practice would save some time and sweat when it comes time to check your bear in with the department. A premolar is taken to help biologists keep track of the age of bears taken in Idaho hunting seasons. It's a matter of scientifically managing bear populations. Age information is shared with the hunter.Hunters could help out a little by keeping their bears' mouths open. Freezing and rigor mortis can make it difficult to take a tooth.

answered 6/23/2002

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What you see is what you get. All results have been posted on the Fish and Game web site. If you enter your license number in the appropriate form, you will see any and all hunts you drew. If one you applied for and wanted is not there, you are one of the many unlucky.

answered 6/23/2002

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You do indeed, as long as you have been an Idaho resident for the five years previous. Growing older in Idaho does have its rewards.

answered 6/9/2002

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Notification should come by July 10 of drawing results but those results will also be posted on the Fish and Game web site at www2.state.id.us/fishgame.

answered 6/3/2002

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If you tried to apply for hunt 2085, it won't be processed because that hunt has been cancelled. Hunt 2084, a later hunt in unit 37, is still available and has had 100 permits added to it. If you tried to apply for hunts 2073 (32-2) or 2089 (39-4) it won't be processed because these hunts are landowner permission hunts and are only available after July 15. The landowners in the hunt area receive permission slips, which they give to interested hunters. Hunters with permission slips can go to the regional offices in Nampa or McCall, or to the Boise Headquarters office, to get the tags and permits for those hunts issued.

answered 5/23/2002

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The general rivers and stream fishing season opens on Saturday, May 25. Most Idaho lakes, ponds, reservoirs, ditches and canals are open for year-round fishing. A few streams don't open until July 1. Consult the 2002-2003 rules booklet for exceptions and to locate family fishing waters. A resident fishing license costs $23.50, or $12.50 for Juniors (age 14-17). A nonresident season license is $74.50, Juniors $38.00. A daily license is $10.50 for the first day plus $4.00 for each day following it.Remember, no fishing license is required for residents or nonresidents on June 8, 2002 which is "Free Fishing Day" in Idaho. Limits and equipment restrictions still apply.

answered 5/19/2002

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Oops. The language on ultralights was removed from page 4 (but left its headline all alone). Ultralights have been defined as aircraft by the Fish and Game Commission. Aircraft may not be used in the act of hunting.

answered 5/6/2002

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A hunting license is required for anyone applying for a controlled hunt. Once you buy the license, you are the proud owner regardless of your luck in the draw.

answered 4/28/2002

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Yes, but it will have to be in a controlled hunt. A person is allowed to purchase three turkey tags a year. They are the spring general season tag or a spring controlled hunt tag, a late spring/fall tag, and a fall controlled hunt tag. If a person uses their spring general season tag or spring controlled hunt tag and their late spring/fall tag to harvest birds in the spring, the only hunt they are eligible for in the fall is the controlled hunt.

answered 4/21/2002

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Nope. This kind of an exchange amounts to a license upgrade, which is now prohibited by Commission policy.

answered 4/14/2002

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Apply for moose, bighorn sheep, and mountain goat before April 30. You must purchase a hunting license before you can apply for a controlled hunt. The cost is $164.50 for residents or $1514.50 for non residents. You may apply for only one species. Applications can be submitted at any license vendor, or by credit card over the phone at 1-800-554-8685, or over the internet. There is an additional fee for credit card charges by phone and over the internet.If you are selected, you will receive the necessary permits and tags in the mail by June 10. If not selected, you will receive a refund (minus $6.50) by June 10. Credit card purchases will be refunded to your credit card.

answered 4/7/2002

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True, but only in the Lolo, Selway and Middle Fork elk hunting zones. These tags will be available beginning July 1.

answered 3/31/2002

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Good catch. That's true: it is illegal in Idaho for people in aircraft to be in communication with hunters on the ground. Now that rule has been extended to paragliders and any other powered craft of that ilk, even though they are not classed as aircraft under federal aviation rules.

answered 3/24/2002

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A proposal to ban the use of electronic communication devices in the taking of game did recently come before the Idaho Fish and Game Commission, but department staff did not recommend a change in current law. The department cited public comment in opposition to the ban. The Commission agreed with the recommendation and kept rules as they were, allowing unrestricted use of electronic communications devices in the field.

answered 3/17/2002

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That's what it means. If you apply for a moose, goat or sheep hunt, you cannot also apply for other big game controlled hunts in the same year. The reason for this is to limit somewhat the number of applicants for moose, goat and sheep so that the odds are more reasonable.Now the exceptions to the rule (you knew there would be some, didn't you?): after applying for moose, goat or sheep, you may go for an unlimited controlled deer hunt, participate in a second tag deer controlled hunt, buy a leftover controlled hunt tag on July 15 or take part in a depredation hunt.

answered 3/10/2002

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Not until the Fish and Game Commission sets the final rules, and after the brochure is printed. The Commission will meet on the rules March 13-15. The booklet should be on the street in mid-April and on the department web site at about the same time.

answered 3/3/2002

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Doing what seems the most expedient—and decent—thing to do at the moment has the potential to cause the citizen to have to explain this action to a magistrate. To avoid this potential, it is best to call Fish and Game or local law enforcement agency. Many of these incidents occur in city or county jurisdictions where discharge of a firearm by private citizens is not legal, causing a problem with the law not even related to Fish and Game laws.

answered 2/24/2002

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Currently, salmon biologists are anticipating enough hatchery chinook salmon will return to Idaho to allow fishing again. Seasons, limits, and open fishing areas will not be determined until more information is available. However, we anticipate enough fish for seasons on the Clearwater River, Little Salmon River, and the South Fork Salmon River this year. More information is needed before we can make a decision on the Snake River, Lower Salmon River, and Clearwater River tributaries. The Department will make their recommendations to the Fish and Game Commission by mid-April for the spring chinook seasons.

answered 2/18/2002

A: 

Yes. The Sportsman's Pack includes a combination license, archery and muzzleloader permits, deer, elk, bear, lion, turkey, steelhead and salmon tags for $107. The cost if bought individually would be $172.

answered 2/10/2002

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No. You can only buy one "late spring/fall general season" tag. This tag is valid during the last two weeks of the spring season as well as the fall season. If you want a second opportunity during the fall for turkeys you may apply for a fall controlled hunt tag and possibly take two turkeys during the fall season. The application period for fall controlled turkey hunts is May 1 - May 31, 2002.

answered 2/3/2002

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That's right, there is no fishing at all for the sturgeon in the Kootenai River drainage because the unique population there appears not to be reproducing and is considered endangered.

answered 1/27/2002

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Right, all Idaho sturgeon populations are strictly protected. If you are enjoying a sturgeon dish, the fish had better have come from Oregon or Washington where keeping sturgeon is still legal, or from a licensed commercial fish hatchery. You can fish for sturgeon in parts of Idaho but the law requires that you do not take them out of the water at all and that you let them go immediately, unharmed. Catch and release sturgeon fishing does have a large and enthusiastic following in Idaho. No sturgeon fishing is allowed in the Kootenai River of northern Idaho.

answered 1/17/2002