Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 3401 - 3425 of 3552 questions

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Yes, but not this year. Fish and Game has delayed imposing a fee of $1.50 when hunters fail to file their reports on time and the license vendor must file the report by computer before a new license can be issued. The delay will give hunters time to see the rule printed and become familiar with it. The fee is now scheduled to go into effect for 2004. The fee will not, of course, apply to those who have filed their reports in a timely manner. The fee pays the vendor for providing the service.

answered 1/12/2003

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It's only free for graduates of an Idaho hunter education course who have never had a hunting license, age 10-17. Call your regional Fish and Game office and find out when the next registration day is. On that day, sign her up for a course. After successfully completing the course she will receive the free license. It is good for hunting upland game and waterfowl. It is not good for turkeys or sandhill cranes. If she is interested in hunting turkeys or sandhill cranes, she needs to get the Youth Small Game Hunting License for $6.50. For big game, she'll have to wait until she's 12 and get the Junior Hunting License.

answered 1/5/2003

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The new Idaho license plate featuring a native cutthroat trout in a mountain scene will join the popular bluebird and elk plates at your county assessor's office early in 2003 but not at the first of January. The graphics for the new plate were not delivered to the Idaho Department of Transportation as quickly as was anticipated, so it looks like something around a month's delay. Patience: The license plate is bound to look fine on anglers' and fish fanciers' favorite rides.

answered 12/29/2002

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The new steelhead season begins on the first day of the new year. A new fishing license and steelhead tag is required. What you hear about the run is right. The run over Lower Granite Dam has exceeded 205,000 steelhead, the second largest run on record. Your Fish and Game Commission recently raised the limits for the spring season to three per day and nine in possession. If you do so well that you want to buy a second tag, you can legally have 40 fish in the new season.

answered 12/22/2002

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True, in muzzleloader-only and traditional muzzleloader seasons, Idaho rules on muzzleloaders require that they are "equipped only with a flint or percussion cap." If you are hunting in an any-weapon season with a muzzleloader, there is no restriction on primers or caps.

answered 12/15/2002

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To report the band, call toll-free to 1-800-327-2263 (BAND). You can keep the band, as most duck hunters want to do. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will send you a certificate that tells you when and where the bird was banded, if you give a mailing address. Banding of migratory birds has been carried out for decades, providing biologists with valuable information about where birds go and where they find the right conditions along the way. The practice also gives some clues about waterfowl harvest levels.

answered 12/10/2002

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Under Idaho law, a moose is a moose, bull or cow, and you can only take one in a lifetime.

answered 12/1/2002

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Yes, in the restructuring of rules and costs for young hunters, nonresident youths from 12-17 will pay the same junior prices as residents pay in 2003. Youths must be accompanied and mentored by the adult holder of a valid Idaho license.

answered 11/24/2002

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Yes, you need a new Idaho hunting license come January 1, 2003, but your federal waterfowl stamp is valid through the end of the current waterfowl season.

answered 11/17/2002

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No, that would be entirely against the law. Fish and Game tries to accommodate folks who are not able-bodied with special license fees for the disabled and even with shoot-from-a-vehicle permits in some special cases, but shooting a game animal for someone else has always been unlawful. "Party hunting" with shooting until all the tags in the group are filled is one of the practices the law is intended to halt, and tickets are regularly issued when it is detected. Essentially, there would be no place to stop if hunters could legally shoot for someone else.

answered 11/7/2002

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No, the deadline that was in effect for muzzleloader and archery permits several years ago has been eliminated.

answered 11/3/2002

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No. The confusion comes from the fact that tag price lists show Jr./Sr./DAV, for Junior, Senior, Disabled American Veteran, on the same line. They are grouped that way because they are priced the same.

answered 10/27/2002

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There is no provision in Idaho law for keeping roadkill and you do not want to be in possession of a dead deer out of season, no tag and so on. If you did keep a carcass, you would most likely wish you had not done so. Collisions with highway traffic usually leave carcasses sadly unusable for human consumption.

answered 10/20/2002

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In that particular population of moose, the occurrence of pure albino moose is just one animal in 100,000. Considering that Idaho does not have 100,000 moose at any one time, it is not a common sight.

answered 10/10/2002

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The rule is pretty simple but your choices in how to meet the law are not as easy as they once were. Lead shot is not legal for any kind of waterfowl hunting anywhere in the United States. The alternative, when the rule went into effect around 1990, was steel shot.Not everyone was happy with steel's performance and it could not be shot in many older, favorite shotguns. Ammunition manufacturers large and small went to work and have come up with several new types of shot that are legal in Idaho for waterfowl shooting. The legal types are listed in the waterfowl proclamation booklet.One type, bismuth shot, is advertised as safe for older guns that will not handle steel. Another, Hevi-shot, is actually heavier than lead shot and reputedly even more effective. A couple of types using tungsten have had good reviews. Steel shot has been improved in several ways, mainly by giving it higher velocity to overcome the problem of having less retained energy than other shot. The downside of the shotshells containing metals other than steel is that they are more expensive. The upside is that shotshells for waterfowling can be found to satisfy just about any need and getting the lead out is credited with saving more than two million birds every year.

answered 10/6/2002

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You are strongly encouraged to wear as much as you need to make yourself visible to other hunters afield, but there is no law in Idaho that requires you to wear hunter orange at any time.

answered 9/30/2002

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Forest Grouse represent an exception to the rules governing hunting of most game birds. Forest grouse may be taken legally with shot, rimfire, centerfire or muzzleloading firearms as well as with bow and arrow. Rocks and sticks are allowed for forest grouse. Unlawful are traps, snares, nets and crossbows. The reason for the liberal rules about taking forest grouse is that the birds are traditional camp food for big game hunters. Big game hunters often do not want to fire a loud firearm in their hunt area.

answered 9/22/2002

A: 

No. That's been tried. Last summer a salmon angler was cited for fishing before hours on the upper Lochsa River. This is 160 miles east of Lewiston, and the officer used the Lewiston paper to determine sunrise. After the citation was issued the angler went home to Montana and looked up the gps location for the spot, looked up some other web site with Greenwich mean time and tried to convince the prosecutor that the sun comes up a few seconds earlier for every few feet you walk east and therefore he was not really THAT early and we should acknowledge this by putting a foot by foot sunrise table in the regulations. The prosecutor didn't buy it. The angler pleaded guilty rather than go to trial. He paid $125.00 for his efforts. Bottom line here is simpler is better. If we put all this material in the rules you would need a big mule to carry them!!

answered 9/8/2002

A: 

Specific shooting times are listed in the upland game regulations for Canada geese, mourning doves and sandhill cranes. The waterfowl regulations have specific shooting times listed for ducks and geese. All these migratory birds' shooting hours run from one-half hour before sunrise to sunset.Big game, upland game and upland bird hunting hours are from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Calculate big game starting times from the official time as listed in the paper or on the news instead of "daylight breaking." On the first day of pheasant season in southern Idaho, the season opens at noon, so that is when shooting hours start.

answered 8/29/2002

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Turkey tags are no longer exchangeable except in the following cases:The spring turkey tag can be exchanged for a spring controlled turkey hunt.The late spring/fall turkey tag can be exchanged for a fall controlled turkey hunt.

answered 8/25/2002

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Besides, of course, your valid Idaho hunting license, you will need the federal stamp and the Federal Migratory Harvest Information Permit. You no longer need an Idaho waterfowl stamp. The Idaho stamp for waterfowl, as well as upland game birds, was discontinued when the last license increase went into effect. Remember non-toxic shot is required for all waterfowl hunting but the choices in shot types is extensive now compared to a few years ago when only steel shot was available.

answered 8/18/2002

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This is indeed about the time of year you may see kokanee start heading up some of our trout steams from lakes and reservoirs. You're right, they are salmon, but being a landlocked variety, fishing for kokanee is not affected by rules for salmon fishing. In most areas kokanee will be counted in your trout limit, but there are exceptions in the rules, so read your rulebook on the specific area you are fishing. Remember, game fish must be hooked in the mouth or head. Not so long ago snagging kokanee was allowed in Idaho, but that is true no longer, and intentional foul-hooking can bring you a ticket.

answered 8/11/2002

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Idaho has 29 elk hunting zones. Tag sales limits—usually called caps—apply to only five of these zones. Even where the caps are in place, the limit is based on historic use and does not represent a serious cut in tags. You can buy a tag.

answered 8/4/2002

A: 

True. Under a law approved in the last Idaho legislature, the age for becoming a licensed hunter has been lowered from 12 to 10. However, hunters 10 and 11 years old will qualify for small game hunting only, not big game hunts, and must be closely supervised by an adult.

answered 7/28/2002

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Yes, indeed. You can purchase a nonresident deer or elk tag—left over from nonresident quotas that went unfilled—for the nonresident price as an extra tag. These tags go on sale August 28 at license vendors as well as Fish and Game offices.

answered 7/21/2002