Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 3351 - 3375 of 3552 questions

A: 

You probably can find one by now and the rules are on the Fish and Game web site at www2.state.id.us/fishgame. The plant where the rules are printed was subject to a major electrical problem, delaying printing and distribution to license vendors. The brochures have been printed and have arrived in several F&G regional offices. They are also being sent to vendors now.

answered 1/26/2004

A: 

Hunter education is not a bad idea for anyone, regardless of age, but your hunting partner is old enough that the Idaho hunter education law does not apply to him. Anyone born from January 1, 1975 on is required to complete hunter education before a license can be issued.

answered 1/15/2004

Q: When I hunted in Oregon, I had to pay for the federal harvest information validation. Then I come back to Idaho and had to pay it again so I could hunt doves last fall. What's the deal with that?

It is for a federal program, so why do the states charge for it, and every one of them charges for it individually? It's not a lot of money but it doesn't seem right.

A: 

You're right, the Harvest Information Program is a federal program. It is aimed at gaining better information on the hunter harvest of migratory birds. But the individual states do the collection of information, so they charge to cover costs incurred because most state wildlife agencies, like Idaho's, are almost completely funded by what amounts to user fees.

answered 1/11/2004

A: 

Sure can. In the new 2004-2005 fishing brochure-available now at vendors and Fish and Game offices-the phrase which said it could not be used for steelhead and salmon has been deleted. A two-pole permit costs $12.50.

answered 1/4/2004

A: 

You are not the only one to run into this situation, but we must point out that the form does say hunting license number. It does not ask you for the tag number. Your hunting license number will let you fill out the report in about 60 seconds and you are good for another year. The form for making a big game mandatory report is found in the hunting section of the Idaho Fish and Game web page at www2.state.id.us/fishgame.

answered 12/21/2003

A: 

The first opportunity to sign up for next year's depredation hunts (if any are declared) will be May 1 through June 30. Those who sign up then will be chosen at random. You can still sign up after June 30 but your name goes on the list of hunters available for depredation hunts after those who signed up first and it goes on the list in order of date. The rules on depredation hunts, where to send applications, and forms are on page 79 of the big game brochure.

answered 12/14/2003

A: 

The receipt guarantees you an elk tag, but does not guarantee the elk tag in the zone you want. For example if you purchase a resident elk receipt for 2004 now and you want the Selway B tag, you can redeem the receipt for the actual tag starting August 1, 2004. As long as there are Selway B elk tags available, the receipt can be redeemed for that tag.

answered 12/7/2003

A: 

No, you may keep 20 steelhead, in addition to the 12 you carded this spring. Maybe the confusion comes because the spring season and the fall season are both tallied on the same tag. Steelhead cards are valid for the entire calendar year, covering both spring and fall steelhead seasons. Spring and fall steelhead season limits are independent of each other. The 2003 fall season limit is 20, regardless of what the spring season limit was or how many steelhead you entered on your 2003 steelhead card under the spring season. There are spaces on the steelhead card for both the spring and fall seasons to accommodate a limit of up to 20, even though season limits are frequently set at less than 20. The 2003 fall steelhead season daily limit is three and you may have up to nine fish in your possession while in the field. Remember, only adipose-clipped steelhead may be killed.

answered 11/23/2003

A: 

The Legislature, in Idaho Code section 36-201, named the coyote as unprotected and predatory wildlife. Therefore, Fish and Game does not manage coyote populations and keeps no harvest information except what is reported by trappers. In the 2001-2002 season, trapper harvest was 1,647 and the next year it was 2,478. Aside from the occasional biological study, such as to measure the impact of removal of coyotes on populations of deer, pheasants and sage grouse, Fish and Game is not directly involved in killing coyotes. IDFG does contract trappers to reduce predators, including coyotes, to protect nesting waterfowl at wildlife management areas. Their harvest is included in the trapper harvest mentioned above.

answered 11/17/2003

A: 

You do need a steelhead tag if you are targeting steelhead, whether you release the fish or not. A fair number of anglers do release most or all of the steelhead they catch, but they must have a valid tag in their possession.

answered 11/9/2003

A: 

Yes, Fish and Game can help you obtain a new card. Our Hunter Education records go back to 1978. Contact Headquarters (208-334-3700) or one of our Fish and Game offices. They can look up your hunter education number and send you a new card if your information is still on file.

answered 11/2/2003

A: 

There is no cutoff date any more, so that is why you do not see it mentioned in the proclamation brochure. The cutoff date for muzzleloader permits was eliminated several years ago. The cutoff date for archery permits was eliminated also.

answered 10/26/2003

A: 

Deer and other big game seasons have long been set to begin on a certain calendar date every year to cut down on the confusion that once reigned because of individual units opening on different dates around Idaho. Setting one opening date for popular seasons also served to prevent hunters from clumping up on opening day in several different areas. At the time the current date system was set, many hunters expressed a strong desire to have a date fixed from year to year so they could make long-range hunting plans. Depending on the calendar in any particular year, your favorite season might begin on a Sunday. Fish and Game regrets any inconvenience to hunters, but the current system was selected after heavy public comment and from many competing suggestions to make as many people as possible happy. State big game manager Brad Compton says he will look for ways to avoid Sunday openings.

answered 10/19/2003

A: 

They should be in place now, thanks to Fish and Game's Salmon Region. The U.S. Forest Service, which usually provides this service, notified Fish and Game recently that they had a funding problem and could not provide them this year. The Salmon Region rented the outhouses and had them delivered. Funding comes from a portion of the salmon and steelhead tag fee added on in the 90s to help cover access costs.

answered 10/9/2003

A: 

Maybe. Fish and Game tries to accommodate those last minute changes of mind, but if the hunt for which you have a tag has already started, no exchange is allowed. Remember, this is only for general-season hunts.

answered 10/5/2003

A: 

The fee for the report will be implemented in April 2004. Those who have not turned in their hunter harvest report by this date will be charged $1.50 for each report not completed. The fee will be charged at license vendors, over the telephone, or through the Internet when a license, tag, permit, or application is purchased.

answered 9/28/2003

A: 

You heard a true story. As of the end of last week, there were about 1,700 nonresident elk tags left. Those tags are available to nonresident hunters or, since August 28, to residents who want to pay the nonresident price for a second tag.

answered 9/21/2003

A: 

No. The information on your intended hunt is collected to help Fish and Game in its management. For example, if one particular unit appears to be drawing a mob, the department needs to know that and may want to look at season structures.

answered 9/14/2003

A: 

The rule on artificial light, which applied only to trout, was dropped several years ago. Lighted lures are okay.

answered 9/7/2003

A: 

Access Yes! is off to an excellent start toward providing exciting private land hunting opportunity. A big part of its continued success and future growth is mutual respect. Treating landowners and the opportunity they are extending to the public with utmost regard cannot be overemphasized. If you go to the list of Access Yes! properties on the Internet at http://www2.state.id.us/fishgame/Hunt/ProgramsInfo/AccessYes/properties.cfm, you will see whether or not the individual landowner wishes you to call before coming to the property.

answered 8/28/2003

A: 

Dove hunting, which begins September 1, requires a federal migratory bird permit ($1.50). But the $15 federal waterfowl stamp is not required to hunt doves. The $1.50 permit is required for doves, sandhill cranes, ducks and geese.

answered 8/24/2003

A: 

No, that only applies to deer, elk and antelope. You can buy your crane permit right up to the last day of your hunt.

answered 8/17/2003

A: 

True, you can have more than one elk tag if you buy a tag through the usual process and then buy an unsold nonresident tag when they go on sale August 28. You will have to pay the nonresident price for this tag.

answered 8/10/2003

A: 

You need a Federal Migratory Game Bird Harvest Information Program, or Federal HIP, validation on your hunting license. It's not really a stamp. It costs $1.50, which pays the license vendor for issuing the validation. It is required for hunting doves, sandhill cranes, snipe and all waterfowl. With the information gained when hunters answer a questionnaire each year when buying the Federal HIP, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service can do a more accurate job of managing these migratory birds.

answered 8/3/2003

A: 

Beginning August 28, any unsold nonresident deer and elk tags will be available for use as a second tag. They sell at regular nonresident tag prices, whether sold to a resident or a nonresident. There are plenty of nonresident deer and elk tags available.

answered 7/27/2003