Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 251 - 275 of 3554 questions

Q: Is it legal to use a drone with a camera to locate animals?

With today's ever spreading use of drones I had the thought how nice it would be to fly one up a couple hundred feet and get a panoramic view around to see if there were elk or deer in the fields behind our stand locations. Ethically this may not "fly", but what about legally?
If you can't use the same time you are hunting what would the written law on it be as far as a timeline, or is there precedent yet in Idaho?

A: 

This issue is addressed by state law in Idaho Code 36-1101 http://legislature.idaho.gov/idstat/Title36/T36CH11SECT36-1101.htm.
 
Idaho Code 36-1101(3) addresses communication of information to persons on the ground, making it unlawful to make use aircraft in any manner to spot or locate game animals, game birds, or furbearing animals from the air and communicate the location of those animals by any signals whatsoever (including radio, visual, or other means) to any person on the ground.
 
This statute prohibits the use of drones in the manner and for the purpose you described.
 
Further, Idaho Code 36-1101(5) prohibits the use of aircraft as an aid to hunting big game, making it unlawful to make use of any aircraft to locate any big game animal for the purpose of hunting those animals during the same calendar day those animals were located from the air.
 
This is certainly becoming a hot topic as drones, or "Unmanned Aerial Systems," are becoming more readily available and affordable for consumer use. There will undoubtedly be further evaluation and scrutiny of both ethical and definition of legal use of these aircraft in the future.
 

answered 10/28/2015

Q: Where is a link to the survey talked about 10/23 in the Lewiston Tribune on selling land owner tags?

Where is a link to the survey talked about 10/23 in the Lewiston Tribune on selling land owner tags?

A: 

Here is the link to the survey: https://idfg.idaho.gov/webform/open-survey-controlled-hunt-drawings-and-....
Thanks for your patience.

answered 10/28/2015

A: 

Yes, a resident may purchase a fishing license and steelhead permit for a nonresident.

answered 10/27/2015

A: 

There is not a handicapped rate for lifetime licenses.  These fees are set by law as a formula using the resident adult license rates (IDAPA 36-413).

answered 10/26/2015

Q: Hunting Age?

I understand that their is a gray area between 16-18 years of age for hunting, my friend and I both have our driver licenses; and are wanting to go out and hunt on our own. We have been hunting for a couple years now, and would like to experience hunting by ourselves. If we purchase adult hunting licenses and have parental consent in some validated form, is it legal to go and hunt?

A: 

The situation you describe, as two juveniles age 16-18 desiring to go hunting alone, does not require you to be with an adult in order to go hunting as long as you are residents of the state of Idaho and you hold the correct license and or tag.  You may be thinking of restrictions placed on "hunting passport" holders and "mentored nonresident youth" or resident  hunters under the age of 12 which do require an adult license holder to be present with them while hunting. 

answered 10/26/2015

Q: How do I receive a muzzleloader permit? And is their a class that you must take to obtain it?

How do I obtain a muzzleloader permit? How much does it cost a resident ? Is their a class to obtain it or is my hunters safety course ok?

A: 

Thank you for your question.
The muzzleloader permit fee is $18.25 for residents and $20.00 for nonresidents.  They can be purchased at any Idaho Fish & Game Regional office or Headquarters, or any Idaho Fish & Game license vendor.  They can also be purchased online at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ or over the phone with our contractor at 1-800-554-8685 with an additional processing fee.  There are no additional classes required to purchase a muzzleloader permit.
If you have any additional questions or need further clarification, please call us at 208-334-3700.

answered 10/26/2015

Q: Can I hunt general elk in Dec. with a controlled elk tag?

I have the elk controlled hunt in 2136 area. Was told i can still hunt in dec. with black powder. Is that true?

A: 

You cannot hunt a general season period with a controlled hunt tag.   The controlled hunt tag only allows you to hunt the species and sex in the area with the weapon for the period stated in the Seasons & Rules for the particular controlled hunt.   Controlled Hunt 2136 is only good for either sex elk with archery 9/6/15 - 09/30/15 or any weapon 10/10/15-10/24/15 in Controlled Hunt Area 1 (all of Unit 1). 

answered 10/25/2015

Q: Oversight

Just doing some research and wondered if the Director of the agency is hired by the Commission or the Governor. Is there any kind of a performance expectation or delegation document?

A: 

The Director of Idaho Department of Fish and Game is hired by the Idaho Fish and Game Commission.  Idaho Code 36-106 describes the statutory duties of the Director.  The Fish and Game Commission annually establishes performance expectations for the Director and they evaluate the performance.  However, personnel evaluation records are exempt from disclosure; please see Idaho Code 74-106.

answered 10/22/2015

Q: Employment Quesion

Good Morning,
I was curious to know what a career path toward being a conservation officer would look like? ie: military or law enforcement. Could a qualified individual apply without having that sort of work experience?
Thank You
Steve Bramel
Houston Texas

A: 

Thank you for your interest in the Idaho Conservation Officer Job or Game Warden as we are sometimes called. You may want to view a recruitment video at https://youtu.be/25IQal5VKgI.  Although a degree is not required, you must have at least 4 upper level college courses in wildlife/fish management.  These courses may include Wildlife Management, Fishery Management, Population Ecology, Mamalogy, Ornithology, Wildlife Ecology, etc. Some of these courses might be available on line. 
Without a degree you need a minimum of the 4 upper level college courses and job experience with a natural resource agency or law enforcement agency that requires law enforcement certification.  Applicants with a BS degree in Wildlife/Fish Management are most competitive during the application process. 
Conservation Officers are Idaho Fish and Game’s front line to local communities.  It is important they can communicate to sportsmen the principles and reasons why seasons, bag limits, and rules exist.  They must also communicate their field observations to fish and wildlife managers in a credible manner.  In addition to the educational requirements, we are looking for Conservation Officers who demonstrate the following characteristics or talents:

Good communication skills that allow you to visit with landowners, sportsmen, the public and agency personnel.  CO’s interact with all these people, understanding that each group may have a different culture and require communication in terms they understand and can relate to.

CO’s need to learn and adapt quickly to understand complex information in order to be problem solvers.

CO’s need high energy levels; they are self-starters with the capacity to self-motivate and must be able to multi-task.

CO’s need to be somewhat assertive:  When the situation calls for quick action and decision making, CO’s have to be assertive.  But they also need to understand and be diplomatic.  This is a tough line to understand and walk.

CO’s must be able and willing to communicate/interact with all types of people while on the other hand be somewhat skeptical.  In LE situations, some people are going to hide things from you.  Diplomatically, you need to interact with them, knowing they may be violating and hiding something from you.

CO’s work alone with little or no supervision. They work in remote areas by themselves; this is tough.  CO’s must interact with others and be comfortable with working alone for many days in a row.  CO’s are independent and adventurous.

CO’s have to be decisive, make the right decisions quickly, and accept those risks associated with quick decisions.
For more information on current job announcements, go to this web site.  https://service.govdelivery.com/service/multi_subscribe.html?code=IDFISH...
You can choose to sign up for notifications.  It allows you to select topics in which you wish to receive email notifications.  
Thank you again for your interest.  For answers to specific question’s regarding employment as a Conservation Officer feel free to visit our web page http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ or contact Assistant Chief of enforcement Blake Phillips at blake.phillips@idfg.idaho.gov.

answered 10/22/2015

Q: Black Powder 209 Primer

Why are the 209 black powder primers not allowed during black powder seasons? I know they are now allowed my question my question is WHY?

A: 

Muzzleloading rifles are considered primitive weapons and hunters choosing to hunt muzzleloader only seasons are often able to take advantage of special opportunities not available to modern center fire rifle hunters.  To maintain the primitive nature of the sport, Idaho has limited some technological advances that would compromise the primitive status of muzzleloading equipment. Current Idaho law requires that during a muzzleloader only hunt, the weapon is equipped with an ignition system in which any portion of the cap is exposed or visible when the weapon is cocked and ready to fire.  Also, the muzzleloader must be equipped with a flint, percussion cap or musket cap, 209 primers are prohibited.  These and other weapon restrictions can be found on page 98 of the 2015 & 2016 Big Game Seasons and Rules brochure.    

answered 10/21/2015

Q: setting traps on private property

May I legally set muskrat traps on posted private property without permission of the owner if I stay below the ordinary high water mark and set the traps below the ordinary high water mark?

A: 

It depends on whether or not the river has been defined as Navigable.  If the river has been defined as Navigable then you are allowed to stay within the high-water marks of the river. If you know its private property you should always get permission first.

answered 10/20/2015

Q: Can i use a shotgun with a scope to hunt deer in idaho?

Can i use a shotgun with a scope to hunt deer in idaho?

A: 

Yes.  It is legal to hunt deer in Idaho with a shotgun equipped with a scope during any-weapon and short-range weapon hunts.  Also, there may be no electronic devices attached to, or incorporated on, the firearm or scope; except scopes containing battery powered or tritium lighted reticles are allowed.  Also, the shotgun must be loaded with shot of #00 buck or larger.  These and other weapon restrictions can be found on page 98 of the 2015 & 2016 Big Game Seasons and Rules brochure.

answered 10/20/2015

Q: CVA Optima V2 - Northwest. Legal for Idaho?

I am going to be hunting the Idaho muzzle loader season and am trying to verify that this gun is Compliant to Idaho's rules. Thank you

A: 

This gun is legal for Idaho muzzle loader hunts as long as all other rules are followed

answered 10/19/2015

Q: Multiple firearms

Can I carry multiple firearms of different calibers while hunting, for the purpose of hunting different game?

A: 

Yes

answered 10/18/2015

Q: Deer hunt

Can you get a bow tag and a rifle tag same season. Is it legal to purchase a bow tag and tag out on it. Then rifle hunt and tag out on that tag. So you would tag out on two deer.

A: 

Our deer tags are not sold for a particular weapon usage.  You can hunt the early Archery Season, and, if you don't harvest, you can hunt the Any Weapon Season.  To hunt the Archery Only, you are required to purchase the Archery Permit.  If you were to harvest in the Archery Season and wish to continue hunting, you can purchase an second deer tag from the unsold Nonresident tags. 

answered 10/18/2015

Q: Fourth of July ridge fire

Why would you do a control burn fire with helicopters and man camps in commissary ridge 4 th July ridge durning middle of bull season why wasn't the hunters aware of this while they were buying tag that unit is tuff enough with all the people and lack access

A: 

This is acutally a pretty good question and is bigger than just the Commissary Ridge area as controlled fires (fires actually ignited for a management purpose) can occur just about anywhere. Controlled fires are a fairly complex topic but their purpose is one that hunters and wildlife enthusiasts should applaude. They are most often designed to improve wildlife habitat in the long-term. There is nothing that does a better job at maintaining and improving habitat than fire in the right place and at the right time.
 In general, controlled burns  require considerable preparation and planning. Once all of that is accomplished, the actual project is subject to weather conditions that create a narrow window when the project can be completed. Wind, moisture, humidity, and more all have to be within a "prescription" in order to proceed with the fire. Timing, therefore, is a major consideration and waiting for all the conditions to line up can be frustrating. Some years it just doesn't happen at all. Other times, the window for burning is small and requires quick action in order to accomplish the objective.
In the case of the Commissary Ridge area of eastern Idaho, this burn is part of a much larger habitat improvement project conducted by the US Forest Service. This project has been in the implementation phase for nearly 10 years and is specifically targeting aspen regeneration, a very important component of wildlife habitat. Each year, a different portion of the project area is prepared for burning, often by felling a number of the conifer trees and letting them get to the "red needle" stage so that the fire will actually burn through the otherwise fire resistent aspens. Projects have always been conducted in autumn because that is when conditions finally become conducive to burning and also because it is outside of wildlife nesting and fawn/calf rearing dates. 
It is unfortunate that these efforts to improve habitat also sometimes coincide with big game hunting seasons. Every effort is made to avoid conflicts with hunters yet with hunting seasons running from August 30 to the end of November, it is impossible to avoid all conflicts. When all the many pieces come together for a project long in planning a preparation, managers must take advantage of that . Hunters should realize that these burns, while annoying in the short-term, help to sustain wildlife populations and provide better hunting in the long-term. 

answered 10/17/2015

Q: No license don't wanna kill anything just watch

Before I go through hunters Ed can I tag along with a buddy and go hunting with him for the sole purpose just to watch and see how it's done?

A: 

Yes

answered 10/17/2015

Q: 63A Deer seasons

I noticed that the regulations changed for the short range season to only allow harvest of antlerless from oct. 10th - 20th and antlered from oct 21-31. What was the reasoning behind changing it to this? Also, I noticed another question that had been asked on this website sometime toward the beginning of 2015 that mentioned their desire for archery only in 63A. I would like to see to it that this does not occur and that the short range season is allowed to continue and I would like to know how to receive the Upper Snake Region newsletter and participate in any regulation making so as to ensure the Short range season for this area continues.

A: 

We have recieved many comments from hunters and landowners who wish to see unit 63A changed to archery only.  They usually cite property damage and human safety as the main reasons.  This issue is discussed nearly every year during the season-setting process.  Shotgun hunters would like the season to remain open to other short-range weapons and archery hunters would like to see it changed to archery only.  The split season was a compromise that was adopted by the commission this year.  Hunters are now required to identify the species and sex of the deer before they shoot.  The rule change was intended to increase the time the animal is observed, decrease hurried shots, and decrease the danger to property and people.  We would be happy to add you to the list of hunters that recieve our newsletter and we look forward to your participation in the season-setting process.  The email address you provided will be added to the list.  You can also call our regional office at 208-525-7290 to have additional email addresses added to the list.

answered 10/16/2015

Q: Steelhead in the Boise river

With the lower return numbers of steelhead. Will there be enough to stock the Boise river?

A: 

We plan to stock the Boise River again in 2015 with steelhead trapped at Hells Canyon dam.  Anticipated release date(s) in November will be advertised in the local media and on our webpage.  Stay tuned!!

answered 10/16/2015

Q: Transfer of elk tags

My uncle was in an accident and is unable to go elk hunting. Can he transfer his tag to me or anyone else?

A: 

In order to best answer your question, we need some additional information.  Please call the Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters office at 208-334-3700.
Thank you.

answered 10/15/2015

Q: Transport of processed venison

My hunting partner and I will be hunting Whitetail deer out of Whitebird, ID. We desire to process or have the animals processed and transport back to Minnesota. Where can we obtain permits for the transport of processed venison harvested in Idaho?

A: 

Good Question.  Page 100 in the Big Game Regulations states:  The validated tag must remain attached to the carcass until the meat is processed and reaches the place of final storage and consumption.  So if you have the animal processed... keep the validated tag with the meat until you reach your home in Minnesota.  A reciept from the processor showing what was processed would also be good to have, but the tag is required.   Good Luck Hunting...

answered 10/15/2015

Q: Steelhead license

Can you print the confirmation email for the 3 day steelhead/salmon and is it valid if your license will not make it in the mail before you go on fishing trip?

A: 

You cannot fish for salmon or steelhead with a confirmation.   You are required to have the permit in hand as it must be notched if you harvest a fish.

answered 10/15/2015

Q: Tags not filled during Archery

If you purchase an Elk B Tag, and a Archery Permit does this limit you to hunt only archery season if you do not harvest an elk? I was told that this is not the case for a deer tag but I would like to be sure before I decide to shoot at anything. Also will I be limited to hunting with a bow because of this?

A: 

You may hunt the appropriate seasons for the tag you possess as listed in the current years big game rule booklets. For example if you purchase an Elk City B elk tag and an archery permit in 2015, you may participate in the early archery season and if you don't harvest in that season, you may participate in the any weapon season in October.
Please contact us at 208-334-3700 if you have additional questions.

answered 10/15/2015

Q: Blm property fenced

I have noticed that some BLM and other federal and state land is fenced, without any notice of no trespassing or no hunting. I have verified on fish & game hunting planer map and it is BLM, state or federal land.
So can one hunt on this property?

A: 

BLM, USFS and state managed lands are mostly accessible to the public.  Some lands such as parks, recreation areas near lakes, around buildings, campgrounds, compounds, etc. usually have a safety zone buffer.  If a piece of public land is not specifically posted with signs it is open to hunting.  Please use caution as always to make sure of your backdrop and safety of others when hunting on public or private land.  Also, just because a piece of land is open does not mean it is safe or responsible to hunt there.  Also, remember that firing a weapon from or across a road is also prohibited, and almost all federal and state agencies have some motorized vehicle travel restrictions.  If you have specific questions about a piece of land, you may wish to contact the agency that is responsible for that land and also obtain a travel plan map of the area from that agency.  Also, if you visit our hunt planner on the FG website, you can find more land ownership designations for your preferred hunting location.

answered 10/15/2015

Q: Elk Concentration Bannock Zone

I am looking to purchase a general season antlerless elk tag in one of the units of the Bannock Zone. I am interested mainly in units 70, 73 and 73A. I am trying to figure out an area to hunt them where the concentrations are higher. I am only familiar with 73A in Bull Canyon but have not seen many elk in that area. Do you have any suggestions on areas to hunt to increase chances of harvesting an elk? Some of these areas are high in private property and I would like to find public land in the area to hunt and have a chance at success. Thank you for your time.

A: 

Elk populations in the Bannock Zone have a patchy somewhat unpredictiable distribution.  We have not had many reports of depredation concerns in this zone this summer/fall, so you may have some success concentrating efforts in higher elevation areas, such as Bannock Peak, Scout Mountain, Kinnport Peak and Elkhorn Mountain.

answered 10/14/2015