Frequently Asked Questions

We get a lot of questions. We post here answers to questions we're being asked frequently. If you have a question not answered here, please contact us. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office. Some answers change over time; please take note of the "answered" date.

Displaying 1 - 25 of 3564 questions

A: 

Congratulations! You are locked in to 2017 prices for 2018.  Just buy you annual license every year for the next 5 years and you will continue to pay 2017 prices each year.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Sorry, but the answer is no. To be part of the Price Lock program, you need to purchase or hold any valid 2017 resident annual license. To continue to stay in the program, you also need to purchase or hold a valid resident annual license in future consecutive years.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Fees for nonresident sportsmen and women were increased in 2009. At the time, this made Idaho’s nonresident fees higher than other western states. Today, Idaho’s nonresident license, tags, and permits are generally in the middle compared to surrounding states.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

You are automatically locked into 2017 prices for any and all other licenses, tags and permits for at least the next 5 years.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

The Price Lock program will last at least for 5 years, through 2022. At that time, the Idaho Legislature and Idaho Fish and Game Commission will review Price Lock to decide if it will continue. If enough people participate in Price Lock, the program may be extended.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

As long as the Price Lock program is active, you may purchase a 3-year resident license any time, or any year, at 2017 prices and receive all the benefits of being locked in. 

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Yes.  To benefit from Price Lock, you will need to buy an annual license each consecutive year after 2017.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

How much you save depends on what tags and permits you usually purchase.  In general, if you buy a 2017 license, you will save 20% on all your items every year you stay in the Price Lock program.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

  • If you are serving in the U.S. military, together with your spouse and children under 18, and are  officially transferred out of state but maintain Idaho as your official state of residence, you are eligible for Price Lock. Proper documentation is required.
  • If you are a fulltime college student attending school out of state but maintain Idaho as your official state of residence, you can still lock in 2017 prices if you didn’t buy a 2017 license.  Proper documentation is required.
  • If you are absent from the state for religious purposes up to two years but maintain Idaho as your official state of residence, you are still eligible for Price Lock. Proper documentation is required.
answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Price Lock is a win-win for you and Idaho Fish and Game. You are keeping your costs to fish, hunt and trap among the lowest in the West, and you are providing consistent funding for wildlife conservation, management and enforcement. In short, with Price Lock you are investing in Idaho’s fish and wildlife – making sure it is there next time you go hunting and fishing.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

Idaho Fish and Game does not receive any general tax money from the State of Idaho.  Most operations are financed through the fees sportsmen and women pay to hunt and fish in Idaho.  The last fee increase for Idaho residents was in 2005.  The cost of managing the State’s fish and wildlife increase every year and has exceeded the funds generated by licenses, tags and permits for several years.  Fish and Game implemented a number of cost-saving measures during these lean times.  In 2017, The State Legislature approved a fee increase, which goes into effect in 2018.  The increase ranges from $1 to $6 dollars on licenses, tags and permits.

answered 6/23/2017

A: 

The Access/Depredation Fee is separate. This fee was enacted by the State Legislature to increase funds available to reimburse landowners for damage caused by wildlife to their crops and property.  The access portion of the fee will go to improve hunting and fishing access.  Learn more about this fee on the Access/Depredation page

answered 6/22/2017

Q: Is it legal to remove sturgeon from the water when ice fishing?

Is it legal to take sturgeon out of the water when fishing a private pond?

A: 

When fishing on PUBLIC waters, sturgeon must not be removed from the water, even when ice fishing.

But, owners of legally permitted private ponds can set their own rules on limits and allowable fish-handling.  That means public fishing rules do not apply to private waters that may contain sturgeon. 

Sturgeon lack a rigid skeleton and removing them from the water can damage their internal organs. Sturgeon live a very long time, so Idaho fishing rules are set up to minimize fishing-related injury to these unique fish.

answered 1/27/2017

A: 

Idaho hunter education and bowhunter education are offered in all parts of the state, but availability varies by region. To find out when classes are offered, check the Idaho Fish and Game Website.

On the home page, click on the "Hunter Education" link in the education menu or the "Hunter Education" button in the right hand column. On the Hunter Education page, click on the link labeled "View or Sign Up for Courses Here." On the next page, scroll down and pick the course you are interested in and then click "View Upcoming Events" to find the nearest town from the list provided. "View Event" and "Register Now" when you find the class or field day you need.

Don't put it off until the last minute, later in the year, as hunting seasons get closer, classes fill up fast!

answered 7/21/2016

Q: What do you mean by center-fire rifle? Is there such a thing as off-center?

If so, where might I find one and what would I use it for?

A: 

Rimfire rifles strike the rim of the casing to ignite the primer rather than the center of the cartride. For this to work the cartridge walls need to be thin enough to be crushed by the firing pin and ignite the primer.  These thin brass walls limit the amount of gunpowder that may be used and consequently their use is limited to small calibers.  The 22LR (Long Rifle) is the most common round using a rimfire setup.

Rimfire rifles may not be used big game hunting in Idaho. More information about rimfire ammunition may be found on wikipedia.

answered 6/29/2016

Q: While hiking in Idaho am I allowed to carry a rifle?

While I'm out hiking or looking for sheds. Can I carry my rifle or shotgun for protection against cougar bear or wolf?

A: 

Yes, you can carry a weapon for protection while you are hiking or looking for shed antlers.  

answered 6/28/2016

A: 

Adult steelhead start swimming into Idaho waters each July. Beginning in July and for the next 10 months anglers pursue steelhead as they migrate up the Snake, Clearwater and Salmon rivers. Steelhead fishing winds down in May as the fish reach their spawning grounds in Idaho’s mountain streams and hatcheries.

answered 6/1/2016

A: 

Because steelhead are in so many places in the state over such a long period of time, it’s hard to say there is a best time and place to go steelhead fishing. However, their upstream migration provides a general timeline for when they will likely arrive in different waters.

July through September: As steelhead start arriving into Idaho they tend to move into the Clearwater River using it as a thermal refuge. These early arriving fish tend to remain in the Clearwater until the Snake River cools toward the end of September or beginning of October.

October through December: October is an exciting time for steelhead anglers as two things tend to happen. Fish start spreading upstream into the Snake and Salmon rivers and by the time you reach November steelhead can be caught about everywhere. Another exciting thing that starts to happen in October is the larger B-run steelhead start entering the Clearwater River.

January and February: January and February can be times to fish with a little more solitude on the Clearwater, Little Salmon and Salmon rivers. Cold water reduces fish activity and catch rates decline, but fishing can still be productive when conditions are good.

March through May: The Salmon River upstream of Salmon, the Little Salmon River, the North Fork Clearwater and the South Fork Clearwater all provide the best fishing in the spring. Catch rates can be really good then as the fish are moving into the smaller rivers at the end of their migration.

Each month of the year and each location provide a completely different experience – the long days of September on the lower Clearwater, a warm October day in the Salmon River canyon, a cold January day in a drift boat near Riggins or Orofino, or the spring thaw in the Stanley Basin in April. The best time to fish for steelhead is a personal choice.

answered 6/1/2016

Q: Where do I report dead squirrels and rodents?

I have heard about the plague and want to report dead wildlife. Where do I do that?

A: 

Please review the information on the Plague page and find "Report Now."

Please note, that if this is an emergency situation, you should call 9-1-1 for immediate response.

 

All sightings are reviewed and passed along to biologists. However, not all reports will be followed-up with individually. Some people may be contacted for additional information, so please fill out the form thoroughly!

 

answered 5/26/2016

A: 

Foremost, keep yourself and your pets protected.

However, if you do find multiple rodents or mammals dead, you can help by reporting the sighting.

answered 5/26/2016

A: 

This online map will be updated regularly to display areas of mass die-offs and generalizes the location where the plague was discovered.

https://idaho.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=99d9e3dd1a...

answered 5/26/2016

A: 

You can greatly reduce the risk of becoming infected with plague by taking simple precautions, including avoiding contact with wild rodents, their fleas and rodent carcasses. You should not feed rodents in picnic or campground areas and never handle sick or dead rodents.

In addition, the "Safety" section of this page outlines additional recommendations.

answered 5/26/2016

A: 

People and pets can be at risk.

People can be exposed to plague when pets have contact with rodents or fleas outdoors, or bring infected rodents or fleas back into the home, or by caring for a sick pet without proper precautions.

answered 5/26/2016

A: 

Plague is a bacterial disease of rodents. Plague occurs naturally in the western United States, particularly Arizona, California, Colorado, and New Mexico. The plague bacterium (Yersinia pestis) is transmitted by fleas and cycles naturally among wild rodents.

answered 5/26/2016

Q: I'm getting the wrong number dialing in to buy an Idaho hunting or fishing license

I tried to dial 1-800-824-3729 like my favorite blog recommended, but that didn't connect to buy a license.

A: 

1-800-824-3729 has been retired for a while as a place to buy licenses from us.

Idaho Fish and Game does have an 800-number for purchasing licenses, but the number above has been retired for this purpose.

 

If you'd like to call-in to buy your hunting or fishing licenses, applications, tags, or permits, then dial: 1-800-554-8685

Most all of the places you'll find this number are in older press releases or in well-meaning blogs or articles that are a little bit out-of-date. 

answered 5/16/2016