Press Release

January 2022

From Hatch to Catch: Hayspur Hatchery near Picabo is Idaho’s rainbow trout capital

There’s a good chance that rainbow trout on the end of your fishing line traces back to the work of Idaho Fish and Game's Hayspur Hatchery. Funded entirely by anglers’ license dollars, Hayspur provides trout for every region of the state, producing 6 to 8 million rainbow trout eggs annually.

Hunter Education instructors needed in the Southwest Region

Are you a safe and responsible hunter or trapper? Are you passionate about hunting ethics? Do you like sharing your knowledge and skills with youth and adults new to Idaho’s hunting traditions?

If so, you should consider becoming a volunteer hunter education instructor for Idaho Fish and Game's Southwest Region.

To get started all you need to do is attend the upcoming virtual instructor orientation workshop for the Southwest Region:

  • February 23, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The orientation will be held on Zoom. If you wish to participate please RSVP by calling Jaime Creson, Volunteer Services Coordinator at (208) 854-8988 or by email at jaime.creson@idfg.idaho.gov.

Farragut Shooting Range Center will remain closed due to lingering icy conditions

Due to continued icy and unsafe roads and conditions, the range will remain closed until further notice.  Please check back here for future updates on when the range will reopen, or you can call the Panhandle Regional office at (208) 769-1414.  Thank you for your continued patience.

Latest Fish and Game wolf population estimate is 1,543 and stable since 2019

Idaho’s wolf population has remained stable and consistent over the last three years based on camera surveys done last summer and since 2019. The 2021 population estimate for Aug. 1 was 1,543 wolves. The 2020 and 2019 estimates were 1,556 and 1,566.

Hunter Education instructors needed in the Magic Valley Region

Are you a safe and responsible hunter or trapper?

Are you passionate about hunting ethics?

Do you like sharing your knowledge and skills with youth and adults new to Idaho’s hunting traditions?

If you answered yes to these questions you should consider becoming a volunteer hunter education instructor for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

To get started all you need to do is attend the upcoming instructor training workshop on February 19th from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Hunter Education Center located at the Magic Valley Regional office in Jerome.

Those who attend will learn about teaching hunter, bowhunter, and trapper education which gets you started towards becoming a certified instructor for any, or all of those programs.

If you wish to participate please RSVP by calling TanaRae Alberti, Volunteer Services Coordinator at (208) 324-4359 or by email at tanarae.alberti@idfg.idaho.gov

Without the critical assistance of volunteer instructors our program would be significantly diminished. We truly appreciate your willingness to help out!

Thank you for making a difference by helping to continue Idaho's hunting heritage!

Feeding backyard deer and elk does more harm than good

Regardless of how cute and fuzzy those deer and elk look this time of year, please remember: They’re built for this environment. They do not need a tray of feed laid out in the backyard in order to survive the winter. They’ve done it for thousands of winters before, and they’ll do it again this winter.

Rare to Idaho, a ringtail was recently found in Twin Falls, and you can see it in a video

Finding a ringtail in Idaho is a very rare occurrence, and the last few sightings have happened near Twin Falls. In early December 2021 staff from the Amalgamated Sugar factory south of Twin Falls spotted a ringtail on the property. Within a few days a wildlife biologist from the Magic Valley Regional set traps with a goal of relocation to more suitable habitat.

Mule deer trapping conducted by Fish and Game biologists to help assess winter survival

Fish and Game biologists with the Magic Valley Region are spending time this winter collaring mule deer does and fawns to assess survival over the coming winter months. Biologists need the data supplied by the GPS collars to make informed recommendations to the Idaho Fish and Game Commission who set upcoming hunting seasons.

sco_austin_dupois_controlling_a_mule_deer_shirley_creek_jan_2022
Creative Commons Licence
Terry Thompson/Idaho Fish and Game

After capture, the deer have a blindfold placed over their eyes to calm them while data is collected

Using statistical models, biologists will analyze the data collected from the GPS collars to estimate how many animals survived the winter.