Press Release

April 2018

Rainbow Trout Stocking Schedule

Personnel from Fish and Game's McCall and Nampa Hatcheries will be releasing
more than 63,000 catchable-sized rainbow trout at the following locations during May.

LOCATION      WEEK STOCKED      NUMBER OF TROUT

Browns Pond (McCall)      May 21      500

Caldwell Pond #2      April 30      500

Duff Lane Pond (Middleton)      April 30      225

Eagle Island Park Pond      May 21      450

East Mountain Reservoir (Cascade)      May 21      500

Eds Pond (Emmett)      May 14      200

Esthers Pond (Boise)      April 30      1,300

Fischer Pond (Cascade)      May 21      750

Grimes Creek (Idaho City)      May 21      1,000

Heros Park Pond (Meridian)      May 7      150

Herrick Reservoir (Cascade)      May 21      3,000

Horsethief Reservoir (Cascade)      May 14, 21      8,000/13,500

Indian Creek (Caldwell)      April 30      200

Indian Creek (Kuna)      May 14      300

Kimberland Meadows Pond (N. Meadows)      May 21      500

Kleiner Pond (Meridian)      May 7, 21      450/450

Lowman Nature Ponds      May 14      600

Lucky Peak Reservoir      May 7, 14     5,700/4,320

Mann Creek Reservoir      May 7      2,400

Marsing Pond      May 14      450

McDevitt Pond (Boise)      May 14, 28      450/450

Merrill Pond (Eagle)      May 14      250

Mill Pond (Horseshoe Bend)      May 14     900

Mores Creek (Idaho City)      May 21      600

Ol' McDonald Pond (Council)      May 21      500

Parkcenter Pond (Boise)      May 7      750

Payette Pond (Payette)      April 30      450

Payette River, Middle Fork      May 21      1,000

Poormans Pond (McCall)      May 21      250

Riverside Pond (Boise)      May 14, 28      360/360

Rotary Pond (Caldwell)      April 30      1,100

Rowlands Pond (McCall)      May 21      1,500

People can help scientists track bumble bees throughout the Northwest

A new project launched to harness the volunteer power of citizen scientists and help map bumble bees in the Pacific Northwest, and anyone with a camera and computer can contribute. This region is home to nearly 30 species of these charismatic and easily recognizable bees, and many of them face an uncertain future. 

People can learn more about the project and how to contribute at the Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas Project website. 

The Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas is spearheaded by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon State University, and the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. The partners are collaborating with citizen scientists to collect information on bumble bees, including Species of Greatest Conservation Need, in Oregon, Washington and Idaho.

“While it is important to understand how well human-influenced landscapes affect bumble bee populations, we also need to know what is happening outside of towns and cities,” said Ross Winton, Fish and Game Regional Wildlife Biologist. “These larger patterns will help us to understand how bumble bees are faring under larger landscape pressures like climate change and drought.”

In recent years, the importance of pollinators and their essential role in keeping our environment healthy by pollinating flowers in natural areas and contributing to successful harvests on farms has been recognized, as has their vulnerability, in large part because of widespread losses of bees.

Declines of pollinator populations are alarming. Much attention has been given to the plight of the introduced European honey bee. Less publicized, but no less important, is the parallel decline of native, wild bee populations, particularly bumble bees.

Proposed grizzly bear season and information meetings; link to comment page

With the grizzly bear population in eastern Idaho fully recovered and removed from federal protection, Idaho Fish and Game will host meetings in Idaho Falls and Boise regarding a proposed fall hunting season. 

Idaho Falls

  • April 17, 6:30 p.m.
  • College of Eastern Idaho
  • 1600 South 2500 East
  • John Christofferson Multi-Purpose Building Cafeteria, Building #3

Boise

  • April 19, 6:30 p.m.
  • Riverside Hotel
  • 2900 W. Chinden Blvd

The current proposal is to offer a single tag for one grizzly bear for the fall season of 2018. The meetings will be held to discuss the proposal and gather public input. They will involve a presentation and then an open house format to gather information and take comment. Comments will be gathered at the meeting, and is now online at idfg.idaho.gov/comment through May 3, 2018.

Hunting is part of the grizzly bear conservation strategy and consistent with the management of bears in the greater Yellowstone area outside of the park and in eastern Idaho. Grizzlies in north Idaho remain under federal protection. 

Fish and Game is managing grizzly bears and proposing a hunting season based on an agreement with Montana and Wyoming. Idaho has the smallest portion of land in the grizzly’s range outside of Yellowstone National Park, and the hunting opportunity will always relatively small compared to the other states.

The Fish and Game Commission has directed department staff to include public involvement for grizzly bear hunting proposal. 

Spring Wildlife Celebration is at the MK Nature Center in Boise on April 28

Idaho Fish and Game invites people to join in a fun and educational Spring Wildlife Celebration from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 28  at the MK Nature Center at 600 S. Walnut St. in Boise. This family-friendly event provides visitors with an opportunity to learn about Idaho’s amazing wildlife. Admission is $3 per person, ages three and over.

Wildlife-themed education tables will be set up around the grounds, including:

  • Learn about animal tracks and make a plaster cast of a track. 
  • Try your hand at making a beaver dam and learn about the beavers that live at the nature center. 
  • Check out live birds of prey to learn about the adaptations of these amazing birds. 
  • Observe a demonstration of retrieving dogs and learn about why they are such important partners for waterfowl and upland gamebird hunters.  

Enjoy these stations and more during the event. People can also add native plants to their landscaping by buying plants  at the Idaho Native Plant Sale, All proceeds support education programs at the nature center. Anyone with questions can call Sue Dudley at (208) 287-2900.  

MK Nature Center hosts native plant sale April 28

The annual native plant sale will be Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the MK Nature Center at 600 S. Walnut St. in Boise. Sponsored by the Pahove Chapter of the Idaho Native Plant Society, the sale offers gardeners  an opportunity to buy native plants for their landscaping projects.  

"Native plants are adapted to our area. They offer many benefits including drought tolerance, beauty and as pollinator attractors," said Vicky Runnoe, Conservation Education Supervisor. "Once established, native plants will thrive with minimal effort on your part.  Pollinators such as  bees, butterflies and hummingbirds will find your yard a perfect habitat, giving you the opportunity to observe these fascinating creatures."

The list of plants that will be available will be posted on the Idaho Native Plant Society website by April 14. For those unsure of which to buy and plant, knowledgeable botanists will be on-hand to provide information and suggestions during the sale.  

All purchases support the Idaho Native Plant Society, MK Nature Center and will provide lasting benefits to your neighborhood wildlife.  

 

Toynbee, other volunteers recognized at Fish and Game Hunter Education-Volunteer Banquet in Salmon

Jim Toynbee was recognized for his volunteer service at the annual Idaho Department of Fish and Game Volunteer Banquet on April 2 at the Sacajawea Interpretive Center in Salmon.

Jim Toynbee2_040218
Creative Commons Licence
IDFG

Toynbee has been a hunter and bow hunter education instructor for the Salmon Region for over 46 years and has certified over 1,000 students.

Many of his students were certified through his Salmon Jr. High School program, but he continued to educate and certify hunters long after he retired from his teaching career. In 1993 he was honored with the title of Idaho State Instructor of the Year and received a lifetime hunting license from the Department.

Trapper education course scheduled May 5 in Salmon

Beginning July 1, 2018, every trapper who purchased their first trapping license after June 30, 2011 will be required to attend and pass a mandatory trapper education course before they can purchase an Idaho trapping license.

Trappers that have successfully passed and are certified through the Idaho voluntary trapper education course are exempt, but new trappers will be required to take the course starting in 2018. Those who have taken only a wolf trapping education course are not exempt and must take the Idaho trapper education course.

Idaho Fish and Game will host at Trapper education course on Saturday, May 5 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Fish and Game Office, 99 Highway 93 North.

The course covers basic trapping techniques with a strong focus on safety and ethical trapper behavior. Selecting safe and responsible trap set locations is emphasized throughout. Other topics include furbearer behavior and management, trapping regulations, equipment selection and maintenance, avoiding non-target catches, and pelt preparation.

Space is limited and registration is required. Participants must be at least 9 years of age and can register at the Fish and Game office or online at https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/education. Registering at a Fish and Game office costs $8. Online registration by credit card requires an added convenience fee of $1.75.

The general furbearer trapping class does not qualify people for the purchase of wolf trapping tags. To trap wolves in Idaho, completion of a wolf trapping class is required. When registering, please be certain to sign up for the course you actually want to complete.

For more information, contact the Idaho Fish and Game office in Salmon at 208-756-2271.

Clearwater Region upcoming trapper/wolf trapper classes

IDFG has scheduled 2 new trapping classes in the Clearwater Region: Standard trapper education will take place on Sunday, 29 April, in Deary. Wolf trapper education will take place on Friday, 28 July, in Lewiston. Both classes will run from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. with a lunch break at midday. See the links below for more information or to register for one of the classes. You also may register in person at our office, IDFG, 3316 16th Street, Lewiston.

Standard Trapper Education link:

https://www.register-ed.com/events/view/12245

Wolf Trapper Education link:

https://www.register-ed.com/events/view/122460

Starting July 1st, 2018, all trappers that have not purchased an Idaho trapping license prior to July 1st, 2011 will be required to attend and pass standard trapper education before purchasing a license. Anyone wanting to trap wolves is required to take wolf trapper education in addition to standard trapper education.

Please contact IDFG at 208-799-5010 with questions.

Construction Work Slated for Spring Shores Road at Lucky Peak Reservoir

Construction work will soon begin to complete the last piece of a multi-year project which allows deer and elk to safely migrate across State Highway 21 between Lucky Peak Reservoir and the Wilderness Ranch area.

Contractors working for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game will be installing specially fabricated “wildlife guards” across Spring Shores Road to prevent big game animals from entering the highway via the access road. “Most people are familiar with cattle guards that prevent livestock movement from one area to another,” Fish and Game habitat biologist Krista Biorn noted. “These wildlife guards are simply a modified design.”

Construction begins on Monday, April 16th and will continue through May 1. During construction, which will not occur on Fridays, Saturdays or Sundays, Spring Shores Road will be reduced to one lane with flaggers regulating traffic.

More than 7,000 mule deer and nearly 1,500 elk spend the winter months on the Boise River Wildlife Management Area and surrounding foothills, browsing, resting and waiting out the long, cold winter season. State Highway 21 bisects this winter range area, and the number of wildlife/vehicle collisions and close encounters has increased steadily as more motorists use the highway.

In 2010, the Idaho Transportation Department completed the construction of a wildlife crossing structure under State Highway 21 at mile post 18.2. In the years that followed, crews installed miles of fencing on both sides of the highway to funnel deer and elk to the underpass. The effort has proven effective at greatly reducing the number of wildlife-vehicle collisions on this section of the roadway and maintaining habitat connectivity.

For more information regarding the wildlife guard construction project, please contact the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Nampa office at 208-465-8465.

- IDFG -

F&G will host informational meetings on proposed grizzly season

With the grizzly bear population in eastern Idaho fully recovered and removed from federal protection, Idaho Fish and Game will host meetings in Idaho Falls and Boise regarding a proposed fall hunting season. 

Idaho Falls

  • April 17, 6:30 p.m.
  • College of Eastern Idaho
  • 1600 South 2500 East
  • John Christofferson Multi-Purpose Building Cafeteria, Building #3

Boise

  • April 19, 6:30 p.m.
  • Riverside Hotel
  • 2900 W. Chinden Blvd

The current proposal is to offer a single tag for one grizzly bear for the fall season of 2018. The meetings will be held to discuss the proposal and gather public input. They will involve a presentation and then an open house format to gather information and take comment. Comments will be gathered at the meeting, and also online at idfg.idaho.gov starting on April 16.

Hunting is part of the grizzly bear conservation strategy and consistent with the management of bears in the greater Yellowstone area outside of the park and in eastern Idaho. Grizzlies in north Idaho remain under federal protection. 

Fish and Game is managing grizzly bears and proposing a hunting season based on an agreement with Montana and Wyoming. Idaho has the smallest portion of land in the grizzly’s range outside of Yellowstone National Park, and the hunting opportunity will always relatively small compared to the other states.

The Fish and Game Commission has directed department staff to include public involvement for grizzly bear hunting proposal. 

Spring black bear season opens April 15 in many hunting units

Hunters can get a chance to hunt big game in the spring with the opener of black bear hunting season on April 15 (some hunting units opened April 1). 

Many parts of the state offer general hunting seasons for black bears, but hunters can not take any female bear with young. Here are the black bear seasons and rules.

Hunters typically spot-and-stalk, bait or use hounds for black bears. For hunters using bait, a baiting permit is required, and other rules apply. 

Hunters who get a bear must present the skull and hide to an Idaho Fish and Game regional office, official check point, or a Fish and Game conservation officer for removal and retention of a premolar tooth, and to have the hide tagged with an official state export tag.

Closing dates for black bear seasons vary by unit, but most run through the May and some into June. 

While bears are prized for their hides, which can be black, cinnamon or occasionally blond, the meat can also be excellent for eating. Bears are omnivores, but most of their diet consists of plants. 

Here are tips and recipes for preparing bear meat, as well as guidelines for butchering and preparation.