Press Release

June 2012

Chinook Seasons to Open on South Fork, Upper Salmon

Chinook fishing seasons on the upper Salmon and South Fork Salmon rivers open Saturday, June 23.

The seasons continue until further notice from Fish and Game.

Seasons open June 23 on:

  • South Fork Salmon, lower - From the bridge on Forest Service Road (Lick Creek/East Fork South Fork Road) where it crosses the South Fork Salmon River main stem just upstream of the confluence with the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, upstream about 18 river miles to the Blackmare Creek pack bridge, accessible from the trailhead at Poverty Flat campground.
  • South Fork Salmon, upper - From Blackmare Creek pack bridge, accessible from the trailhead at Poverty Flat campground, upstream about 17 river miles south to a posted boundary about 100 yards downstream from the Idaho Fish and Game South Fork Salmon River weir and trap.
  • Upper Salmon River, Stanley Area - From the State Highway 75 Salmon River bridge about 250 yards upstream of the mouth of the East Fork Salmon River upstream to the posted boundary about 100 yards downstream of the weir and trap at Sawtooth Hatchery south of Stanley.

These waters would remain open until closed by further notice. Fishing hours on the South Fork will be from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., and on the upper Salmon from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Daily bag limits will be four Chinook, no more than two of which may be adults, and the possession limit will be 12 Chinook, no more than six of which may be adults. Anglers must stop fishing for salmon when daily, possession or season limits of adult salmon are reached, which ever comes first.

The season limit is 20 adult Chinook salmon statewide during 2012 salmon seasons occurring before September 1, 2012.

Participation is Encouraged in Idaho's Wildlife Summit

Anyone with an interest in wildlife in Idaho is encouraged to participate in the Idaho Wildlife Summit August 24, 25 and 26.

The Summit will convene at the Riverside Hotel in Boise and six concurrent satellite sites in Coeur d'Alene, Lewiston, Twin Falls, Pocatello, Idaho Falls and Salmon. People may participate online if they are unable to attend in person.

The Summit is a landmark event for wildlife conservation in Idaho. It is the most far-reaching undertaking the agency has attempted, in terms of encouraging all wildlife enthusiasts to participate and the technologies being used to engage them.

Idaho Fish and Game hopes to gain a better understanding of what is important to people in terms of the future of wildlife. One way for participants to express that is through an "Idaho CafŽ" on Saturday afternoon.

The Idaho CafŽ is a structured discussion, in which participants will be able to exchange ideas. They will gather in a cafŽ-like setting with four people around a small table to discuss a specific question and record their thoughts.

After about a half hour, three people at each table will move to different tables; one will stay. The process then repeats with a new question.

Participants will get through five questions in about 2 1/2 hours.

Participants also may share their opinions in several "Fishing Polls" - a simple electronic poll also known as a clicker poll - with instant or nearly instant results. At several times during the Summit, participants will be asked to respond to survey questions by using any electronic device that has texting capability, such as a cell phone, a smart phone or a home computer.

The event also will include opportunities for participants to learn about the challenges facing wildlife conservation through presentations by several experts and through "Trading Posts."

Test Confirms, Pup is Wild Wolf

A DNA test shows that a pup picked up outside Ketchum on May 25 is a wild wolf.

Out of town campers picked up what they thought was a lost domestic puppy outside Ketchum and took it to a vet clinic in town. Officials thought the male puppy looked like it might be a wolf.

Idaho Fish and Game looked for a wolf pack near where the pup was found, hoping to return the lost pup. But they could find no fresh sign of a pack in the area.

Zoo Boise agreed to take the pup temporarily and to help Fish and Game find it a permanent home. Zoo officials are compiling a list of facilities accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums that would be suitable for the pup.

The pup is gaining weight and his health is improving.

People are reminded that it is best to leave young animals in the wild alone. In the case of the pup, it is possible that the pack was moving with the pups - perhaps from a den to a rendezvous site - and may have been disturbed by traffic on the road.

Don't Eat Dead Fish from Meridian Pond

Dead fish in the recently opened Kleiner Pond in Meridian may be harmful if eaten.

The city of Meridian recently treated aquatic weeds in the pond in the newly opened Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park. The treatment apparently killed fish stocked in the pond. Fishery official say the fish may contain enough copper from the treatment to make them unfit for human consumption.

Conservation Officer Charlie Justus warns anyone who may have picked up dead fish at the pond not to eat them.

Chinook Seasons Set on South Fork, Upper Salmon

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission Monday, June 11, approved Chinook fishing seasons on the upper Salmon and South Fork Salmon rivers.

The Chinook fishing season opens June 23 and continues until further notice from Fish and Game.

Seasons open June 23 on:

  • South Fork Salmon, lower - From the bridge on Forest Service Road (Lick Creek/East Fork South Fork Road) where it crosses the South Fork Salmon River main stem just upstream of the confluence with the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, upstream about 18 river miles to the Blackmare Creek pack bridge, accessible from the trailhead at Poverty Flat campground.
  • South Fork Salmon, upper - From Blackmare Creek pack bridge, accessible from the trailhead at Poverty Flat campground, upstream about 17 river miles south to a posted boundary about 100 yards downstream from the Idaho Fish and Game South Fork Salmon River weir and trap.
  • Upper Salmon River, Stanley Area - From the State Highway 75 Salmon River bridge about 250 yards upstream of the mouth of the East Fork Salmon River upstream to the posted boundary about 100 yards downstream of the weir and trap at Sawtooth Hatchery south of Stanley.

These waters would remain open until closed by further notice. Fishing hours on the South Fork will be from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., and on the upper Salmon from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Daily bag limits will be four Chinook, no more than two of which may be adults, and the possession limit will be 12 Chinook, no more than six of which may be adults. Anglers must stop fishing for salmon when daily, possession or season limits of adult salmon are reached, whichever comes first.

The season limit is 20 adult Chinook salmon statewide during 2012 salmon seasons occurring before September 1, 2012.

Moose Tags Available

Idaho Fish and Game has 11 moose controlled hunt tags available.

The application period begins Friday, June 15, and runs through June 25. Any tags left over from this drawing will be available first-come first-served beginning July 10.

Moose tags available are:

  • Hunt No. 3031 Area 10-1 - 1 tag.
  • Hunt No. 3034 Area 10-4 - 1 tag.
  • Hunt No. 3036 Area 10-6 - 1 tag.
  • Hunt No. 3044 Area 12-3 - 1 tag.
  • Hunt No. 3045 Area 12-4 - 1 tag.
  • Hunt No. 3047 Area 12-6 - 1 tag.
  • Hunt No. 3053 Area 16A - 2 tags.
  • Hunt No. 3056 Area 20 - 2 tags.
  • Hunt No. 3057 Area 27 - 1 tag.

No mountain goat or bighorn sheep tags are available. Check the Moose, Mountain Goat and Bighorn Sheep Rules Brochure and the controlled hunt information section for details on each hunt and specific controlled hunt information.

The list of available moose tags is available at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/.

Controlled hunt applications may be submitted at any hunting and fishing license vendor, Fish and Game office, with a credit card by calling 1-800-55HUNT5 or 1-800-824-3729, or online at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov.

The resident controlled hunt tag and application fee is $173. The nonresident controlled hunt tag and application fee is $2,116.50. These fees include a nonrefundable application fee of $6.25. Application and tag fees must be included with applications for moose hunts.

There is a service charge for processing phone-in and Internet applications. The phone-in charge is 3 percent of the transaction plus $5.50; the Internet charge is 3 percent of the transaction plus $3.50.

Register Now for Wildlife Summit

The Idaho Wildlife Summit will be August 24 through 26 at locations in Boise and six concurrent satellite sites in Coeur d'Alene, Lewiston, Salmon, Twin Falls, Pocatello and Idaho Falls.

People also may participate online.

Participation is free, but registration is required because of limited seating. For information and to register go online to http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/summit/.

  • Riverside Hotel, Boise - 500 seats.
  • Northern Idaho Community College, Coeur d'Alene - 100 seats.
  • Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, Idaho Falls - 100 seats.
  • Red Lion, Lewiston - 100 seats.
  • Red Lion Hotel, Pocatello - 100 seats.
  • Idaho Fish and Game office, Salmon - 100 seats.
  • Canyon Crest, Twin Falls - 100 seats.

This statewide event will allow residents to participate and to interact in real time. The purpose is to involve as many people as possible in helping to set the direction for how wildlife is managed in Idaho, to find common ground, and ultimately to build a broader base of support for wildlife conservation.

The Summit will start Friday afternoon, continue through Saturday and end about Sunday noon. It will feature presentations by Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter; Shane Mahoney, a biologist and prominent spokesman for wildlife conservation from Newfoundland in eastern Canada; by Toni Hardesty, a former director of the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and now director for The Nature Conservancy-Idaho; and by Jim Posewitz, founder of Orion The Hunter's Institute.

On Saturday afternoon, participants will gather in a series of rotating groups of four to discuss a series of questions. Throughout the event, information booths at all seven sites staffed by Fish and Game employees will be open to provide information about the breadth of activities of Idaho Fish and Game.

Fish and Game Commission to Meet in Bonners Ferry

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission will meet July 11 and 12 in Bonners Ferry.

A public hearing will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 11.

Commissioners will consider nonbiological rules for all game animals,

nonresident deer and elk tag quotas, nonresident deer and elk tag outfitter set-aside, and release of bighorn sheep tags for auction and lottery.

Commissioners will provide direction on the expenditure of animal damage control funds, and they will hear legislative proposals, a migratory game birds briefing, a presentation on the fiscal 2014 preliminary budget, and consider a hunting season for sandhill cranes.

A complete agenda will be posted on the Fish and Game website when it becomes available.

Survey Covers Elk Hunting Experiences in Idaho

Idaho Fish and Game is participating in a survey about elk hunting in Idaho, and what elk hunters like and don't like.

The survey is being conducted by the University of Idaho.

Participants are being asked about their experiences hunting elk, and how they feel about Fish and Game restrictions on elk hunting.

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission is in the process of revising its elk management plan, and would like public input on this topic.

Some future strategies are being considered for improved elk management.

The questionnaire has been mailed to a random sample of 6,200 people who purchased elk general hunting tags in Idaho in 2011. Anyone who received a questionnaire in the mail should go to the website it lists.

Anyone else interested is encouraged to take the survey online at the Idaho Fish and Game website at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov, under "Comments / Surveys / Questions". Please enter your ZIP code.

The closing date is Friday, June 22.

F&G Plans Public Meetings on Sandhill Season

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is planning public meetings during the week of June 25-29 to gather comments on the 2012 sandhill crane seasons.

An open house meeting will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 5, in the Upper Snake Region office in Idaho Falls to discuss sandhill crane permit levels and proposed nonbiological rule changes.

Other locations and times will be announced when they are set.

The Idaho allocation of cranes this year is lower than 2011, and the lowest since 2004. The Idaho Fish and Game Commission will set the 2012 sandhill crane seasons at the July 12 meeting in Coeur d'Alene. Season dates would fall between September 1 and January 31, with a daily bag limit of three birds.

Sandhill crane tags are made available on a first-come first-served basis.

Ask Fish and Game: Recording Salmon Catch

Q. Do I need to record salmon I keep that are less than 24 inches on my permit?

A. No. Anglers need to record only Chinook salmon longer than 24 inches on their permit. But salmon less than 24 inches in total length still apply toward the daily possession bag limits.

Correction: F&G Plans Public Meetings on Sandhill Season

A news release sent out earlier Monday, June 11, included an incorrect date for an open house meeting in Idaho Falls.

The open house meeting will be from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 26, in the Upper Snake Region office in Idaho Falls to discuss sandhill crane permit levels.